The Theme Of Beauty In The Bluest Eye By Toni Morrison

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Females have the desire to look physically attractive and they strive to reach the standards of being beautiful. We see girls from all ranges of different ages and races altering and adjusting their physical attributes in order to reach the standards of being beautiful. For not being considered beautiful will lead to lack of self-esteem and rejection among their peers and society. In Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, the women often face the pressure of society’s idea of “beautiful” through the use of the media to push images on what beauty should look like. Any women falling outside of society’s standards can be labeled as “Ugly” leaving woman to have low self-esteem and a feeling of rejection, isolation, and self-hatred of their own bodies. …show more content…
For example, the character Pecola have been viewed as nothing but “Ugly” by her society which cause her to have a bad self-evaluation on herself and low self-esteem. In evident, Morrison writes, “If her eyes, those eyes that held the pictures and knew the sights – if those eyes of hers were different, that is to say, beautiful… That only a miracle could relieve her, she would never know her beauty. She would see only what there was to see: the eyes of other people” (46). This reflects on how Pecola sees herself, her self-esteem is fully in the hands of society for she is only what society thinks of her. She believe in what everybody thinks of her allowing society to dictate her …show more content…
Believing she could only be truly happy if she gets those blue eyes that will make her beautiful which will give her a more happy and better life. A life that her ugliness cannot give her. In Addition, The book The Bluest Eye is not the only place where women want to change their physical appearance in order to look beautiful and fit up to society standards of beauty. In the article ”Modification of the body: a comparative analysis of views of youths in Penang, Malaysia and Seoul, South Korea” it states, “Women are not forced to change their bodies yet the constant exposure to narrow beauty ideals in society and media makes them feel that they need to change some aspect of their body to become more beautiful. Even though women are able to make choices related to beauty practices, it is hard to conclude that these choices are truly free of social influences and pressure” (3). This verifies the notion that society puts pressure on women to adapt to their standards of beauty shaming anyone who does not fit into their standards. When a women falls short to society’s standards it comes with a significant amount of body dissatisfaction,

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