The Importance Of Animal Vaccines

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A horse on the farm has just been born, and before anything else happens, it is essential to understand what will be required medically to give that animal a long, happy life. Vaccines are one of these essential ingredients, and Triple-ET Innovator is a vaccine that most certainly will be on the grocery list. But what are vaccines and how do they work? Once that is understood this specific vaccine can be explored further. Amazingly, Triple-ET Innovator prevents four different diseases. All of these will be discussed in addition to proper vaccination protocol when using this particular substance, such as how much is needed, where to inject and when to inject. Hopefully, it will be clear that vaccines, and this one in particular, are extremely …show more content…
Similar to their function in humans, vaccines help prevent disease in animals by allowing the immune system a chance to fight weakened forms of the disease and build up immunity. This is crucial for the health and welfare of animals in veterinary medicine and also protects humans as well. Many issues that arise in household pets can be zoonotic and create a major problem for owners. Interestingly enough, there is actually many variations of vaccine. The one described above, where the body fights a live version of the microbe, is called a "live" vaccine. There are also "killed/inactivated" vaccines, which present a dead microbe to the body. "Subunit" vaccines allow the immune system to study specific epitopes that are on antigens. "Conjugate" and "Toxoid" are both primarily for bacterium defense; conjugate helps the body study sugar coatings on some bacteria and toxoid gives strength against toxins released by bacteria. Finally, DNA and "recombinant vector" vaccines both focus on genetic code. DNA vaccines let the body produce the antigens itself when injected, while recombinant vector takes DNA from the disease that will be prevented and injects it with another weak virus. Both of …show more content…
The dosage is always one mL administered intramuscularly. The standard schedule for previously unvaccinated horses includes a second dose about a month after the initial shot. After those two, yearly vaccinations should be given. The timeline for foals is also very important when administering these vaccines. According to one site “vaccination may be started at 2 to 3 months of age…4 primary doses should be administered, with a 4 week interval between the first and second doses and a 4 week interval between the second and third doses. The fourth dose should be administered at 10 to 12 months of age prior to the onset of the next mosquito season” (Eastern/Western). Several other schedule suggestions include what to do for previously unvaccinated adult horses, pregnant mares and unknown vaccine histories. Several important notes for this vaccine include storing in the dark and at low temperature (but not freezing), shaking well before use and exhausting the entire contents after opening. There are not really any serious adverse effects to this vaccination. Some local reaction at the injection sights, such as swelling and inflammation, are common. (Fluvac

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