Napoleon Animal Farm Quote Analysis

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“Napoleon was a large, rather fierce-looking Berkshire boar, the only Berkshire on the farm, not much of a talker, but with a reputation for getting his own way” (Orwell 16). Evidently, this foreshadows the fact that Napoleon, who was rather smart, will make himself dictator and have complete control of the farm by using authoritarian and totalitarian tactics just as Stalin did. Napoleon was extremely thirsty for power and got what he wanted by using terror as well as propaganda that none of the animals on the farm could fight against. He was a stern and harsh boar who manipulated the animals on the farm through cruelty, deception, and treachery to get his ways. It is without a doubt that Napoleon was a dictatorial leader who was obviously …show more content…
Towards the middle of the book, he educates nine puppies himself and “…kept them in seclusion that the rest of the farm soon forgot their existence” (Orwell 35). These dogs later attack Snowball who is exiled off from the farm. Unfortunately, power consumes Napoleon who consequently becomes Jones, the person everyone was trying to get rid of from the start, and adopts his ways of living. The following quote helps the reader understand the political and historical allusions George Orwell was making when writing the book: “He also criticized the new regime for suppressing democracy in the Communist Party and for failing to develop adequate economic planning. In response, Stalin and his supporters launched a propaganda counterattack against Trotsky” (history.com).It is without a doubt that Napoleon’s role in the novel is to be an allegorical representation of a former Soviet dictator, Joseph Stalin. Meanwhile, Snowball represents Leon Trotsky. There are many political and historical allusions to the events of communism and of the Soviet Union in the book. For example, when Napoleon negotiates with the neighboring farms, an untrustworthy man betrays him and steals some lumber. This is an allusion …show more content…
It said, “All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others” (Orwell 134). Although the commandment starts by saying that everyone is equal, the second part proves that there is a distinction between the classes. It is evident that the “some” are the privileged pigs and the rest of the animals are less equal than them; their main purpose is to provide the rulers with whatever they need such as food and services to complete their luxurious lives as totalitarian leaders. It is important to highlight the fact that there was class stratification before the rebellion took place as well as afterwards. The humans, who were the so called masters, represented the higher class and all the animals on the farm represented a lower class who was unified against the common enemy, humans. However, once the animals got rid of Jones, there was some sort of power vacuum and the animals started dividing with the pigs taking on the responsibility of making Old Major’s dream a reality. Interestingly, there is already a power struggle between two of the smartest pigs who are in charge, that is, Snowball and Napoleon. Unfortunately, Snowball is expulsed and Napoleon stratifies society through deception, oppression, and force. As a result, he gets and does what he wants which includes changing the commandments to his liking. Furthermore, the animals like Boxer, who was an allegorical representation of the

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