Second World War Prophecies Analysis

Amazing Essays
After the First World War and airpower’s contribution in dealing with the stalemate warfare, some people recognized its great potential, and started to envision its use in future conflicts. Those people, that can be called theorists, visionaries, or airpower prophets started to think how to further develop an airpower, and how it can be best used in the future warfare. Furthermore, they provided their theories and predictions of its tactical and strategic use in order to give military commanders a powerful tool to gain victory in the future wars. During the interwar years, their prophecies and predictions not only shaped airpower development, but influenced tactics and strategies during the Second World War. In other words, their prophecies …show more content…
That ultimate fulfillment of their prophecies and predictions can be summarized in their vision of airpower use. To win the war, one must first; conquer the air; use airpower as offensive weapon; gain air superiority to provide support to the ground forces; fight in the air, and deny enemy to fly; and destroy enemy support in order to break their capability and will to fight. From all those interwar airpower theorists and prophets, few of them distinguished from others. The famous ones, whose visions of airpower contributed the most to the Allied victory, are Giulio Douhet, Sir Hugh Trenchard, Sir John Slessor, William “Billy” Mitchell, and Henry Harley “Hap” Arnold. This essay will present some of the main predictions and prophecies those above mentioned theorists advocated in order to point out how airpower contributed in Allied victory. Moreover, through examples of the battles, campaigns, and military decisions during the Second World War, it will show how their predictions fulfilled airpower’s role in shaping the path to the final Allied victory in the Second …show more content…
Predicting that “command of the air” can be gained only through offensive airpower, which will lead to air-to-air battles for air supremacy. Gaining air supremacy, will enable protection and support of own surface forces to fight, and possibility to attack enemy’s vital targets from the air. This essay only emphasized the main and specific predictions for each of the famous theorists, and provided just a few examples from Second World War fronts to present fulfillment of their prophecies. Nevertheless, their prophecies and predictions of airpower represented the ultimate fulfillment in airpower’s contribution to the Allied victory in the Second World

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Invention Of Airpower

    • 1226 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Moreover, that attitude was so strong it finally led to the establishment of Royal Air Force (RAF). It was the first independent air force service born of technology, and technology dependent for the future development.10 Trenchard and other British airpower advocates, during the interwar years, theorized how to use new technologies in the possible future wars. In their minds, it was clear that next war would be the clash between fleets of thanks and aircraft. They strongly believed in aircraft as an offensive weapon, that brought fear to both soldiers and civilians, could end war in minutes. Thus, using a concept of strategic bombing in mass terror raids on enemy cities, for which they argued, can end the war before armies are mobilized.11 Therefore, it is necessary to say that technology had the most influence on Britain’s airpower development.…

    • 1226 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Third, the offensive is stronger from the air war. Fourth, target acquisition, and bombing accuracy are manageable problems, night navigation. Finally, Air superiority is a prerequisite for all other military operations. Air exploitation Trenchard want to inflict damage in civilians but with an indirect attack thought the destruction…

    • 1962 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Additionally, this aerial battleground became important to the development of new fighters, like the Supermarine Spitfire and the Hawker Hurricane, as well as the refinement of fighter tactics for both the Luftwaffe and the RAF. Dowding’s in-depth understanding of the employment of airpower and the logistics behind deploying the RAF’s aircraft gave him the ability to revitalize the decrepit Air Ministry. He, along with others who sought the need for change to defeat Britain’s enemies, devoted many days to ensuring that Britain had successfully repelled the Nazi, up until that point, unstoppable advance through Europe and protect the citizens requiring their sacrifice, thus influencing the victory of Britain during the Battle of…

    • 969 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Nationalism became the leading force in the certification of the German identity, and the newly created German superpower wanted to look for “their place in the sun”. Nationalistic ideologies and national self-interest became the reason this large scale war broke out and tore away at Europe. Their decision to go into a “irrational” war was largely based on their “rational calculations” and national interest, and the armistice that lead to the Treaty of Versailles would prove that national interest is always in the mind of nations when they go into war, and when they end the war. At the time, Germany was allied with Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire, while the source of the…

    • 1470 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “If moved rapidly enough, concentrations of tanks could smash through enemy lines and into the enemy 's rear, destroying supplies and artillery positions and decreasing the enemy 's will to resist” ("The Concept of Blitzkrieg"). Germany and Heinz knew that Blitzkrieg was also the key to bring them victories during battles. They broke through enemy lines and went straight to their capitol, the capitol was the objective to get. Germans knew that capturing the capitol was the key to making the enemy surrender, because if the enemy lost their capital their government would fall ("The Concept of Blitzkrieg"). “Although, it is often forgotten that surprise was also very important to the success of Blitzkrieg and that is why Germany never declared war on any country that it attacked.” ("The Concept of Blitzkrieg") When the Germans used Blitzkrieg in their invasions, the Germans made these nations surrender in a couple weeks or a month…

    • 2200 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The formulation of Allied World War II strategy was an evolutionary process. It began with Admiral Stark’s “Plan Dog” memorandum providing the early outline for Allied strategy and ended with a unified Anglo-American-Russian plan for victory. British and American leadership discovered the advantages and disadvantages of coalition operations as they struggled to identify a unified grand strategy during numerous meetings during the war. The Germany First strategy that was solidified at the Arcadia Conference ensured Allied survival and the Tehran Conference produced a unified strategy that achieved victory. Britain’s Sun Tzu approach was prevalent early in the war when means were limited and they were the dominate partner.…

    • 1352 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Airpower Development

    • 1846 Words
    • 8 Pages

    After airpower’s contribution during the First World War and its impact on the stalemate that had developed, some people recognized its great potential, and began to envision its use in future conflicts. These theorists, or visionaries, began to think how to develop further airpower, and how it could be best used in the future warfare. During the interwar years, their prophecies and predictions not only shaped airpower development, but influenced tactics and strategies during the Second World War. In other words, the use of allied airpower in the Second World War represented the ultimate fulfillment of the predictions and prophecies put forward during the interwar years. In order to successfully and efficiently use airpower, and ultimately…

    • 1846 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Hitler's Airpower Theory

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Theories on airpower and how best to use it has evolved over the past century due to experiences from the battlefield and with increasing air technology and communications ability. WWI and WWII were instrumental in creating a background on which to build current airpower theory. Early theorists such as Douhet, Mitchell, and Trenchard focused primarily on strategic bombing as a way to subdue the enemy. Current theorists have modified this stance to include the thinking and the morale of the enemy as well as using effects-based operations. Airpower theory has incorporated lessons learned over the past century by moving from a service centric view of battle and use of primarily strategic bombardment into a more joint or unified stance with…

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Italian General Douhet claimed that air forces would become the primary means for the conduction of warfare and armies and naval forces would be marginalized if not even superfluous. He believed, that a war could be quickly won through the utilization of bomber forces in a strategic campaign against the adversary’s territory. Furthermore, he argued, that aerial bombardment of enemy’s population and vital center would demoralize civilians to such extend that they would turn against the government and overthrow it. Conclusively, his emphasis on the strategic offensive sphere of airpower led to his notion that air defense roles such as anti-aircraft artillery or intercept fighter airplanes could not counter the overwhelming long-range bomber…

    • 2025 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    During the Second World War the importance of logistics was of key importance for the eventual Allied victory over the Axis Powers. The Allies from the very beginning understood the importance of logistics and while the U.S. was incapable of diving into and intentional war poured an abundance of support towards other countries in the fight against Hitler’s Nazi war machine. Once the U.S. was able formally join the Grand Alliance, the development of a highly sophisticated logistical system allowed for support with equipment, such as tanks, small vehicles, air craft, weaponry and, munitions, not to mention men. The critical importance of air power is also dually noted and described in two separate phases, the initial and the evolution of air…

    • 1959 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays