The Importance Of Accountability In Education

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One of the most controversial topics of the current age in education is that of accountability. So much so, in fact, teachers have been accused of teaching to a high-stakes test, often to the detriment of learners, while failing to teach students valuable problem-solving and analytical skills. Nationwide, a debate has been brewing for years over what students should know, the effective teaching practices that ensure that learning, and how that learning is measured. Teachers are expected to differentiate their instruction, but standardize their tests. It is a widely held belief that accountability to a single standardized test is not the most effective way to demonstrate competency (Deubel, 2008). Rather, educational leaders continue to investigate …show more content…
Student learning should be considered not just in terms of immediate lessons, but more in long-term goals that give more meaning to what and why students are learning, incorporating social issues and daily life into lessons. Effective teachers recognize the potential in each child, regardless of their circumstances, and they encourage goal-setting and emphasize the importance of hard work in reaching those goals (Ladson-Billings, 2011). Effective teachers must also communicate the how’s and why’s of the curriculum. It is not enough just to deliver information. Rather, they must help students understand why they are learning what they are learning and how it will be relevant to their …show more content…
That simple statement has stirred controversy for years in the world of education, but because of the research of Dr. Howard Gardner and his colleagues at Harvard University’s College of Graduate Education, the theory of multiple intelligences has revolutionized education in the present generation (Harvard-Smithsonian, 1999). Despite harsh criticism from many, the theory has provided an educational foundation that is based in experience, practice, and activity with an ultimate goal of understanding and application. Genes and experience determine a child’s intelligence profile, and when educators take the time to get to know children and teach in a way they understand, real learning takes place. The proof is when the learner can appropriately apply prior knowledge in new situations. Gardner suggests that by studying fewer things with more depth with varied instruction, children understand more, which agrees with Common Core State Standards. Not only does practical application encourage creativity, invention, and discovery, it also decreases discipline problems by engaging students in meaningful activities that capture and hold their attention. The teacher must first capture attention using multiple entry points for lessons including stories, art, role play, or models. Then tie in prior knowledge with the use of examples, metaphors or analogies. Finally, allow students to express and demonstrate mastery of the topic in what Gardner calls

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