The Hikikomori System

800 Words 4 Pages
In the Japanese school system, it is the goal of teachers to educate all students equally and treat them as identical. This is accomplished through creating an environment in which students feel connected and responsible for fulfilling their established roles in the classroom or around the school. This group-oriented academic structure, mainly used in elementary schools, encourages the establishment of a sense of obligation to a student’s peers, which is the foundation of the idea that Japanese identity is defined by social obligations and links to others. This can be seen in the elementary school activities involving the rotation of roles for lunch helpers and room cleaners.
At all times, the Japanese “I” is involved in a large web of relationships.
…show more content…
Many people that are Hikikomori have been subjected to ijime, which also is believed to stem from the inability to adapt to the social structure in Japanese schools. In order to avoid being bullied, many student will choose to not go to school, which eventually leads to the complete withdrawal from society. This is consistent with the idea of “The Alternative Scene” Hikikomori, which are people that are unwilling to conform or have been unable to adapt to the group-oriented structures that surround them. In Saito Tamaki’s view, “The Alternative Scene” Hikikomori seems to exhibit the main “symptom” that causes Japanese people to withdraw, as he believes that this phenomenon is the evidence of Japan’s constraining social structures. Many people that are Hikikomori have been subjected to ijime, which, as mentioned above, is believed to stem from the inability to adapt to the social structure in Japanese schools. In order to avoid being bullied, many student will choose to not go to school, which eventually leads to the complete withdrawal from society. Overall, it seems that in these cases, the Hikikomori in their Japanese “selves” are unable to conform to the Japanese societal structure, and they are permanently engaged in an early phase of social development. In this phase, they are unable to emulate and respond to the societal expectations of

Related Documents