Gender Differences In Education Essay

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In the past, the main focus of educators was to make sure that their students subject grades and scores met the education standards requires of them to complete school. However, in the twenty-first century, there has been a major focus on creating equity in the classroom and better teaching strategies that cater for all student. This essay will focus on the implications of gender differences in the classroom and how teachers can approach the differences in educational achievements, behaviours and expectations amongst male and female students to construct positive gender images. This essay summarises the main concerns of gender inequality in the past and how it has shaped today 's attitude towards equal opportunity for both sexes. It also discusses …show more content…
From a young age girls and boys are unconsciously taught that they are different physically, emotionally and intellectually and that they should expect different things out of life (Paechter, 2007). Girls and boys may pick up on subtle cues from teachers about how well they should be performing and what subjects they should be interested in based on their gender. The combination of different social factors, especially gender related issues, can have an influential effect on a student 's ability to achieve certain subjects, some of which these influences are developed within the classroom (King et al, 2010). Schools have a large role in constructing, defining and reinforcing positive gender images and one of the roles of a teacher are to prevent gender-based discrimination in schools and aim to expand student’s views of gender. The Queensland College of Teachers [QCT] (2011) Professional Standards for Queensland Teachers was created to provide teachers an outline of what is expected of them, in order to gain a teacher’s registration. QCT Standard 4 states that teachers are required to "identify and develop understanding of the diverse backgrounds and

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