Napoleon Bonaparte: The Rise Of The French Revolution

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The French Revolution occurred toward the end of the 18th century, in 1789. The oppressed peasantry and middle class revolted against the nobility and clergymen in an attempt to overthrow the emperor, Louis XVI. Though they succeeded in overthrowing the emperor and establishing their own government, their success was short. They nominated a political leader, Napoleon Bonaparte, to lead their new republic. He took charge and began to conquer parts of Europe; feeling that he gained enough strength, he crowned himself emperor. He remained in power until 1814, during which he was removed from the throne; he returned the following year for a short time until he was exiled. After his exile, the Bourbon Dynasty was restored. Before the French …show more content…
During his conquests he developed his most famous reform, the Napoleonic code; it included laws that would affect all aspects of the country and controlled area. Under his code, he established that all men have equal rights and eliminated class privileges. By giving his citizens rights, it contradicted the long standing belief that the Church was more deserving. People felt that if they were entitled to rights, they had more worth. Napoleon also allowed divorces, which were previously prohibited by the Catholic Church; through his reforms, he removed some of the ecclesiastical power. In order to assure the Church, Napoleon made an agreement with the pope, Pope Pius VII, called the Concordat. The Church was given permission to worship but had to give up its confiscated land. By helping the Church, the French government was able to dominate in. Because the state allowed its comeback, the state became superior to the Church. This fed into the growing faith in the government and declining belief in …show more content…
The Church continued to stand and practice formally; the papacy and Church still existed. However, its influence was minimized and the religious belief of the country weakened. With the restoration of the Bourbon dynasty, the Church was restored and once again gained power. Despite this, the idea of secularism had already made its impact; the French loyalty had already switched from Christendom to secularism and government. The French Revolution was a major turning point in French, and European, history. The repression of the Church during the revolution and Napoleonic era influenced the religion in France permanently. It developed the country into a secular one instead of a religious one. The secularism influenced the way humanity saw itself. People were no longer helpless and Church supporting; they were able to succeed and make a difference without religion. The revolution also had a major effect on modern science. The French Revolution changed France and the world, both ideologically and

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