The Impacts Of The American Revolution

Good Essays
The American Revolution (1775-1783) may be considered a “revolutionary event” because it forever changed American society by igniting a unified stance of independence separate from British rule. On one hand, the Revolution produced independence that unified the American people for a common purpose to claim their well deserved “freedoms and liberties” and maintain aspects their American social structure and its economy as it was, without domination from the King. On the other hand, there was no necessity for a revolution or a civil upheaval, when Parliament already gave elected American citizens the authority to maintain public affairs and enforced a moderate sum of taxation on the American economy, which was hardly disrupted or exceedingly …show more content…
These countries experienced social, economic, and religious turmoil that required revolutionary justice in terms of overturning a maniacal authority, where as for colonial Americans, it was primarily a revolutionary principle that caused them to revolt against Britain and the crown. Although, Americans did not suffer at the hands of a barbaric dictator, still they were compelled by their established order that there is a law of nature that transcends government. It was the assertion that sovereign power is always subordinate to the principles of natural law and that natural rights adhere to all people by virtue of their humanity that made the American Revolution …show more content…
Although revolution unified the people to withdraw as subjects from Great Britain for matters that directly involved imperial rule, many revolutionists found the event to be profoundly unsettling when, in the end, a resolution for independence hinged on the issue regarding the nature of the British constitutions relationship between the Crown and its subjects. The colonist defended their British heritage that was corrupted by King George III and sought to have liberation from the constraints of his prime ministers. Thomas Jefferson challenged the King’s tyranny in writing the Declaration of Independence in hopes to gain public support for American Congress’s decision for

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Infringement of Rights in the Colonies The American Revolution must be viewed as much more than the want for separation from the mother country. Parliament not only disregards the fact that the colonies should live and abide by the same laws and liberties within the realms of England, but treats the colonies as if they are much less than what they are. The hunger for power in England ultimately ensued the end of their rule in the colonies. The American Revolution must be considered a defense of traditional notions of English liberty because the king repeatedly strips the colonies from the same freedoms that the people inside England have. Many colonists’ want for the separation from England is no secret by the time the Stamp Act Congress…

    • 1029 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Colonial America Dbq

    • 740 Words
    • 3 Pages

    During the mid-eighteenth century, royal authorities tightened their control of colonists who desired higher degrees of self-government with minimal royal control. John Locke argued for natural rights; an individual’s basic rights for life, liberty and happiness, arguing also that when rulers fail to protect these rights, the people were at liberty to overthrow the government. Naturally, the increased attempt to control the colonist along with the growing desire for natural rights increased resistance among colonists, leading into the revolution. The Revolutionary Era By the middle of the eighteenth century, colonists supported the war for independence, deciding the only way to achieve liberty was to protect and separate themselves from British control. Balancing the delicate line between liberty and equality in the new American republic meant Revolutionary leaders must protect the rights of individuals and states.…

    • 740 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    At the same time that the American colonists were fighting for “unalienable rights,” they were taking away the rights and property of loyalists, barring females from political participation, consolidating the status of slavery, and denying Native Americans basic rights that the tyrant King of Britain awarded them. The example of the Declaration of Independence serves as a strong rallying point for any subordinated classes in America due to the fact that it contains the self-aggrandizing phrase “all men are created equal.” However this phrase has not come to fruition for all Americans, yet it does point to an inconsistency in American law. The text of the Declaration of Independence written at the time of African slave-owning exemplifies controversy; however, what constitutes personhood and property, at this time, was vastly different from the notions of…

    • 1141 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The colonist wanted to have peace an appeal was made Olive Branch petition, it was not favorable by the King had negative affect to the colonies. Thomas Paine wrote the common sense to appeal to the colonist of the unfair treatment that they are received from the “ evil of monarch”. Common sense had four parts in discussing the problems faced with its mother country and why should the colonies separate and fight as a nation. With the support of the people, a movement was placed in to separate from the mother country and fight for their belief for freedom. The American Revolution was set to “ built institutions and codified the language and ideas that still define Americans’ image of…

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Founding Fathers, when they declared the independence of the Americas, were motivated by personal desires. In order to get the power over the colonies, they manipulated the colonist into believing that the British were to blame, and not the wealthy in America. The founding fathers did this to gain the power that Britain had over the colonies. Some historians however argue that the colonists liberties were violated and that subsequently lead to the colonist revolt. But as evidence shows, the colonists were swayed by the founding fathers who were looked upon as leadership.…

    • 1250 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Thomas Paine 's Common Sense Contribution To American Revolution Thomas Paine (1737-1809), famous for his political radicalism ideologies, published Common Sense in 1776. Common Sense was a hugely influential pamphlet urging the end of the British rule on America. Paine can be said to have played the greatest role of convincing the American people to engage in a spirit of revolution rather than rebellion. Rebellion differs from the revolution in that its agenda is resistance to the government while that of revolution is to replace the government. Paine’s approach to revolution and equality among the Americans people created a sense of uneasiness among other revolutionists who were not as generous in their political thought as Paine was.…

    • 1144 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    . .” (Reader, pp. 448-449) These unalienable rights mentioned are rights that are presumed to be natural, as in universal to all people, but when the colonists were not being fairly represented by the government of Great Britain, which they were still expected to abide by, they felt like those rights were not being given to them, and so they revolted against their homeland. Prior to the beginning of the revolution, Great Britain had been doing things such as sending troops to wage war in the colonies, imposing unfair taxes and blocking off trade to other parts of the world, and making legislative decisions for the colonists without any say from the colonists themselves. (Reader, p. 450) The extensive listing of grievances to the king just went to show how fed up the colonists were, and made the revolution seem justifiable under the circumstances given.…

    • 1152 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This revolutionary idea of overthrowing a failing government greatly influenced the American colonists in their revolt against Great Britain, and is evidenced in the Declaration of Independence. Similar to Locke, Voltaire believed that the freedom of religion promoted peace and equality. He believed that, “If one religion only were allowed in England, the government would very possibly become arbitrary…but as there are such a multitude, they all live happy and in peace” (Document B). With many religions conducting business and trading ideas, it is impossible for one entity to dominate. The concept of the personal freedom to exercise one’s own religion is as essential to the success of society as the freedom to protect and preserve the…

    • 640 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Gregg Frazer, author of “The American Revolution: Not a just war” affirms that the American Revolution was much more than just a war. Although it was based on the Illuminist ideals that preached ideals of freedom and equality of rights, the independence of the United States was realized by the colonial elite and aimed at guaranteeing the interests and privileges of this class. It has inspired other similar movements in America. For the first time in the history of European expansion, a colony became independent through a revolutionary act. And he did so not only by proclaiming to the world, in the historical document approved on July 4, the right to independence and free choice of every people and every person ("the right to life, freedom…

    • 1122 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “The task before the Americans was not to restore a good state of affairs they once had enjoyed [pre-American Revolution]— it was to abandon their old ways so they could build a republic of their own.”1 Other members of society, such as women and enslaved peoples, threatened the revolutionaries’ ideas by proposing equality and interest in redefining terms and laws in their own favor. Such is the way of a monarchy. The American Revolution could be thought of as a monarchy in the sense that the nobility of men were the king/ parliament that wrote laws and provided order that only benefited the men who had liberty and rights. The women, enslaved peoples, and Native Americans were thought of as the common folk who had to follow orders no matter the cost. This monarchy of sorts caused a certain hierarchy in Colonial America.…

    • 1342 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays