The Impacts Of Langston Hughes: The Harlem Renaissance

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Langston Hughes, the brilliant poet and author of the twentieth century, once wrote that it was the “mission of an artist is to interpret beauty to people - the beauty within themselves.” This mission delegated to all artists was no easy task; especially African-Americans who were consistently persecuted and ignored by white supremacists. For example, if you had a idea - an idea that would change the way that people think of you - but were persecuted and attacked for presenting it, would you make that idea a reality? The African-American artists of the 1920s and 1930s went against all oppression and published wonderful works under their name, making them one of the first people of color to openly share their masterpieces. This period of mass …show more content…
For example, due to the decimated economy of the South because of the Civil War, many “African-Americans headed [north] for jobs, education, and opportunities, [especially in Harlem], known as the Great Migration” (“The Harlem Renaissance” 1). Blacks migrated to the North to escape the prejudiced Southerners and to find jobs because of the economic boom. Although many African-Americans were leaving the region where they had lived for generations, most of them left with bright eyes full of courage. By taking residence in the North, specifically Harlem, the negroes unknowingly established the birthplace for the revival of black pride. Because of the mass growth of “intellectuals, artists, entrepreneurs, and advocates [in Harlem,] Harlem became known as the Black Mecca” (“The Harlem Renaissance” 2). These many intellectuals and thinkers were important to the start of the Harlem Renaissance because they were the first to question the place of African-Americans in white society. Artists and authors, such as Langston Hughes, brought recognition to the misunderstood and stereotyped culture of African Americans. With many blacks living in one area, the great minds of Harlem created inspiration for young African-Americans while “jazz music, African-American fine art, and black literature flowed into the national consciousness, black culture gained attention and …show more content…
For example, with the creation of commercial radio, jazz music “became popular among middle-class white Americans” (“The Jazz Age” 1). The creation of the commercial radio was important to the birth of the Harlem Renaissance because the radio broadcasted all kinds of music, announcements, and series for citizens to hear. Here, middle-class got their first taste of jazz music. Most teenagers had a radio in their home by the 1920s, so the upbeat tune reached all those who wanted to break the status quo. In addition, jazz became a type of “music that was an early vehicle for the integration of some aspects of African-American culture into white society” (“The Jazz Age” 1). Jazz had a positive and happy effect on those who listened; it brought about diversity in the originally traditional culture of white Americans. With bright-eyed African Americans witnessing the popularity of jazz grow, they determined the perfect time to bring about acceptance of black culture into white: the 1920s. Young people, entranced by jazz, were the first generation “of teenagers to rebel against their parents and their parents’ traditional culture” (“The Jazz Age” 2). By rebelling against the racist, segregated tradition of their forefathers, the white teenagers were more open and accepting to the culture of African Americans due to their love of the African-based jazz music. Not everyone was pleased with

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