Dorothy Haener

1862 Words 8 Pages
Not everyone served their country by fighting the Axis Powers on the front line. Many did their part in their hometown and Dorothy Haener was one of them. She contributed to the war effort by working in a plant and inspecting B-24 parts. Even growing up, Dorothy was exposed to the expectation that women were to aspire to marriage and raise a family while their husbands worked. She also noticed that many men thought women were inferior to them and were even lower in their eyes if they were married. While the war was going on Dorothy was laid off when another company took over the plant she worked at and had to pick up other jobs with a lower pay. Things didn’t get easier for her from there. Not long after she joined the UAW (the United Automobile …show more content…
Her husband (Camille Gagne) was a part of the 82nd Airborne and was shipped out to Fort Benning in Georgia for even more training. Due to the additional training Camille missed the birth of his son and didn’t have the chance to see him. After the training in Fort Benning, his unit went to North Africa for further training before being put into battle in both Sicily and Salerno. Without her husband at home, Jeanette had to raise her son by herself. Her mother took care of Robert while Jeanette automated war planes to make them work more efficiently and accurately. Eventually her mom found that taking care of a newborn was too much for her and switched roles with Jeanette. While all this was happening back home, Camille survived D-Day, but died at Nijmegen leaving Jeanette to take care of their son by herself. When he died Jeanette accepted Camille’s Silver Star for him and was forced to start a new life which began with her worrying she’d never love again. She remarried eventually to a man named William Norton who loved Robert as his own. They lived happily together until he died of a heart attack in …show more content…
In an attempt to start a new life for him, Art convinced a man who was intoxicated to sign the mandatory permission slip for the Marines in place of his father. His drill instructor, Pete Bonardi, was especially tough on him and had little faith in his abilities. In fact when they reunited in Parris Island years later, Pete admits that “[he] was sure [Art] would get killed” (291). Even from the get-go not few people believed in him and Art admits he was klutz. At first Art helped with the loading of ammunition onto Marine Corsairs, but after he accidentally dropped a bomb on one Pete gave him a new assignment. Pete had Arthur working on a newspaper for the squadron and driving trucks. At training his drill instructor told him “you had the ability to screw up a two-car funeral. Anything you touched ceased to function”. While Pete was on his back Art had to deal with his “buddies” that he served with’s caustic remarks about him being Jewish and the names they called him. Due to being picked on he got into a lot of fights despite being “a man of wit and words than fists” (Brokaw 288). Despite the treatment Art was a marine for three and a half years and considers them to be family. After the war, Arthur was able to go to the University of Southern California and later Paris courtesy of the GI Bill albeit he didn’t

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