The Impacts Of Antibiotic Resistance To Antibiotics

996 Words 4 Pages
Antibiotic resistance allows harmful microbes to exist thereby posing a major threat to many species. These microbes reject the antibiotics used to treat them; this leads to more bacterial infections, increased monetary funds to treat the infections, dangerous side effects from the use of several different antibiotics, and increased morbidity and mortality (“Impacts of Antibiotic Resistance”, 2014). The healthcare system’s approach to this widespread, global issue may be extremely expensive in cost and time. Over 10 million deaths have been recorded per year because of antibiotic resistance, and 100 trillion dollars have been invested solely by the United Kingdom to combat it (Mckenna, 2014). Microbial resistance to antibiotics affects …show more content…
According to a previous study, there is a direct relationship between antibiotic use and growth of resistance (Ventola, 2015). There are approximately 325,000,000 people in the United States today, and in 2010, each person, on average, received 22 doses of antibiotic (U.S. and World Population Clock, 2016). People are receiving more than sufficient amounts of medication, making it easier for microbes to adapt. The most common medical issues treated by antibiotics are: respiratory-revolved, upper respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and ear infections; in many cases, these are frequently caused by viruses rather than bacteria and are not even treatable by antibiotics. There were 23,000,000 prescriptions overall for these four complications (Antibiotic Resistance Research and Surveillance, 2014). Also, large amounts of antibiotics are introduced into the environment as other sources besides medication. For example, fruit trees are exposed to large amounts of tetracycline and streptomycin, two relatively common antibiotics, as pesticides in the United States (Ventola, 2015). The exaggerated use of antibiotics for unnecessary situations has put the human population in an uncomfortable …show more content…
Research concerning animals outside of agricultural animals has received much less attention. Dr. Barry McMahon, a lecturer in wildlife conservation at the University College Dublin, believes wildlife and environmental factors are huge components in understanding antimicrobial resistance (Milius, 2016). Few to no cases of antibiotic resistance transferred from wild animals to humans have been identified, but it is much more likely for companion animals to pass on the genes since they have more contact with

Related Documents