Microbial Resistance To Antibiotics: The Impacts Of Antibiotic Resistance

Superior Essays
Antibiotic resistance allows harmful microbes to exist thereby posing a major threat to many species. These microbes reject the antibiotics used to treat them; this leads to more bacterial infections, increased monetary funds to treat the infections, dangerous side effects from the use of several different antibiotics, and increased morbidity and mortality (“Impacts of Antibiotic Resistance”, 2014). The healthcare system’s approach to this widespread, global issue may be extremely expensive in cost and time. Over 10 million deaths have been recorded per year because of antibiotic resistance, and 100 trillion dollars have been invested solely by the United Kingdom to combat it (Mckenna, 2014). Microbial resistance to antibiotics affects …show more content…
According to a previous study, there is a direct relationship between antibiotic use and growth of resistance (Ventola, 2015). There are approximately 325,000,000 people in the United States today, and in 2010, each person, on average, received 22 doses of antibiotic (U.S. and World Population Clock, 2016). People are receiving more than sufficient amounts of medication, making it easier for microbes to adapt. The most common medical issues treated by antibiotics are: respiratory-revolved, upper respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and ear infections; in many cases, these are frequently caused by viruses rather than bacteria and are not even treatable by antibiotics. There were 23,000,000 prescriptions overall for these four complications (Antibiotic Resistance Research and Surveillance, 2014). Also, large amounts of antibiotics are introduced into the environment as other sources besides medication. For example, fruit trees are exposed to large amounts of tetracycline and streptomycin, two relatively common antibiotics, as pesticides in the United States (Ventola, 2015). The exaggerated use of antibiotics for unnecessary situations has put the human population in an uncomfortable …show more content…
Eighty percent of antibiotics sold in the United States today contribute to the health and growth of livestock (Ventola, 2015). Most of these antibiotics are disposed of through excretion, allowing them to enter directly into the environment. Enhancing food animals to their best quality has been a prominent benefit of antimicrobial compound use (Mathew, 2007). This fact alone has made it extremely difficult for food producers to stray away from this old

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Over Prescription Drugs

    • 2085 Words
    • 9 Pages

    For example, the common cold is sometimes treated with antibiotics to get better much quicker than just waiting it out. This overuse of antibiotics can cause bad bacteria to be resistant to medication leading them to be useless. According to the CDC “At least 30 percent of antibiotics prescribed in the United States are unnecessary.”(CDC) The number of unnecessary prescriptions is a risky proposition because the use of these drugs for the common cold can lead to super viruses. A deadly reason over prescription of antibiotics is bad 23,000 people in the US die from antibiotic-resistant infections. According to the (CDC) 250,000 people in the US are hospitalized from a strain of bacteria known to be resistant in overuse of antibiotics.…

    • 2085 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Human Microbiome

    • 1029 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Imagine a world where something as common as strep throat could kill you. Antibiotic resistance is an issue that becomes more and more severe as each day passes, however the threat of antibiotic resistance has been easily overlooked by millions. Antibiotics are used to treat infections that are caused by thousands of different bacteria, and have saved billions of lives since penicillin was created in 1940 by Alexander Fleming (Daniel, 1987). “The current world-wide increase in resistant bacteria and, simultaneously, the downward trend in the development of new antibiotics have serious implications.” (Cars & Nordberg). Whether it be strep throat, pneumonia, or tuberculosis antibiotics have dramatically lowered the mortality rate of these infections…

    • 1029 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In this reading regarding pharmaceutical industries reveal some shocking facts about how contaminated prescription drugs are poisoning the public, since the scandal, it has made policy makers extremely difficult for policing the safety and effectiveness of prescription drugs. By statistic, our massive domestic prescription drug industry sold 294 billion worth of drugs worldwide and 177.5 billion domestically, and it has helped patients from various disease. However, beside the huge success of prescription drug industry, one controversial questions remind unanswered, it is a two decade old law that make large companies pay a “fee” for faster evaluation and approval of new drugs, which makes up a large portion of FDA’s income. First of all,…

    • 788 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria Bacterial infections are a leading cause of death all over the world, especially in children and the elderly, whose immune systems are not at their peak. The discovery of antibiotics in the 1940s provided doctors with a powerful weapon against harmful bacteria, often times by inhibiting their protein synthesis or cell wall formation. Within a few years of their use against certain bacteria, however, some antibiotics’ effectiveness began to decline. The relationship between MRSA bacteria and penicillin is one of many cases that demonstrate this. Within a decade of being used against MRSA, penicillin-resistant S. aureus strains became common in hospitals (Mayo Clinic).…

    • 1677 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Opioids In Brave New World

    • 1879 Words
    • 8 Pages

    While reading Brave New World, I noticed that in order to achieve a hedonistic society like the one apparent in Brave New World, drug use has to play a big part in society. While drug use is embraced by Brave New World, it is a growing problem in today’s world. It is something that affects millions of lives daily and degrades mental health. Opioids, especially are a huge problem in today’s world. About 116 people die a day from opioid-related drug overdoses.…

    • 1879 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Literature Review The majority of the literature agrees that antibiotic resistance is a serious issue that results mainly due to the overuse and misuse of antibiotics. This issue is causing a large financial impact on the health care system. A study conducted by Rajasekar, Guest, and Bodansky (2015), analyzed the medical records of 100 patients in order to ascertain whether or not these patients actually had illnesses that could be treated with antibiotics, or if the antibiotics were misused. The study discovered that over 40% of the patients were prescribed antibiotics even though there was no solid proof that they were suffering from an infection that could be cured by antibiotics (Rajasekar et al., 2015). Further studies have corroborated…

    • 1841 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    It can cost tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars to perfect a new GM crop. Not surprisingly, almost all GM crops currently released are produced by biotech corporations who are after the highest profit rate (Crook). Profit rate can be increased by decreasing production rate, large corporations do this by using the minimum amount of testing. Evidence has been found that there are real health risks associated with the GMO industry, mainly to do with the heavy reliance on chemicals that these modified crops depend upon. The pesticides from GMO plants are new to humans, and we can’t be sure how they will affect our bodies; however, we definitely do know that pesticides (a term that includes herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides) are linked to cancer, neurological diseases, and a number of other very serious health concerns (GMOs).…

    • 1390 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The risk to the environment. About 72% of the U.S genetically modified crops are modified to withstand certain types of herbicides, but the weeds that intended to be killed by this herbicide are becoming bigger and stronger. So, to kill this superweeds resistant strains, more quantities of pesticides are needed to kill the weeds. In the U.S, these superweeds are resistant to Roundup herbicide have taken over ten million acres of farmland. One of the worst herbicide resistant superweeds, Palmer pigweed, had infested a million acres in North Carolina and half million in Georgia.…

    • 379 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    To illustrate, studies have shown that GMO foods have left harmful materials behind inside of us that can cause negative long term effects (10 Reasons To Avoid GMOS). GMO consumption has caused many cases of health issues and concerns. Researchers say that Americans with three or more chronic illnesses increased from 7% to 13% in just nine years (10 Reasons To Avoid GMOS). This has a great correlation to the increase of the production of GMOs over the years. The GMO insecticides can transfer into the DNA of bacteria living inside of us, proven to appear in the fetus and blood of pregnant women (10 Reasons To Avoid GMOS).…

    • 1020 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Antibiotic resistance has been on the rise in recent years, and currently more than 23,000 people die from antibiotic resistant infections every year in the United States.1 Resistant bacteria make infections harder to treat and cost an estimated $20 billion in direct healthcare costs in the US.1 Antibiotic resistance is a natural product of evolution; however, humans have helped to accelerate the process over the last century. Over prescription and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in both developing and developed nations, poor patient follow through, and preventative use in livestock have all contributed to the issue. Without new treatments, the results of such accelerated resistance could be as profound as the inability to treat common…

    • 955 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays