The Impact Of The DREAM Act

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In the past decade, the United States has dealt with many social, political, economic, and security issues involving immigration. Millions of undocumented immigrants are living in the United States. Several actions have been taken by our government to address the problems with immigration, while aiming to look out for their well-being as well. Higher education for immigrant children has been an ongoing issue. In 2001, Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, or the DREAM Act bill, was first introduced by both Republican and Democrats, but failed to pass in Congress (Olivares). A big push in 2010 to reintroduce a modified version of the Dream Act failed the necessary sixty percent vote in the U.S. Senate. Additionally, modified …show more content…
The federal Dream Act legislation helps undocumented students who grew up in the United States and meet certain requirements, an opportunity to enlist in the armed forces or go to college (Olivares). After just two years of participation in the DREAM Act, undocumented students would now have a pathway to U.S. citizenship, which they otherwise would not have without this legislation. (Olivares). However, conservative and liberal viewpoints differ on this issue. While supporters of this bill feel it is good for our economy, security, and our nation as a whole, others oppose the bill and believe it is only promotes amnesty for illegal aliens and hurts our economy. With the introduction of the Dream Act, came many opposing views. Conservative strongest criticism of this legislation is the Dream Act “would grant …show more content…
Not only the undocumented immigrants benefit, but additionally supporters of this legislation feel it would be essential to the United States as a whole. With its passage “the DREAM Act would add significant value, jobs, and tax revenue to the American economy” (Guzmán and Jara). Overall, “the passage of the DREAM Act would add $329 billion to the U.S. economy and create 1.4 million new jobs” (Guzmán and Jara). The Center for American Progress findings are “by enabling 2.1 million eager-to-be-Americans to contribute to building the American Dream would deliver a double boost to our economy.” (Guzmán and Jara). Since only undocumented students who have graduated from high school and complete some college would be eligible for legalization to this country, the DREAM Act provides incentive for them to better themselves and become productive members of our society (Guzmán and Jara). In addition, rather than allowing these undocumented immigrants to settle for “low-wage jobs from employers who pay them under the table”, their legalization under the DREAM Act would help them obtain high-paying jobs which will help them be self-sufficient and contribute back to our country (Guzmán and Jara). Furthermore, supporters of the Dream Act believe this legislation would not grant amnesty and “eligibility requirements for legal status under the DREAM Act are strict and legal

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