The Impact Of The Civil Rights Movement On Desegregated Schools

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Chapter 6- This chapter is about the impact that the Civil Right Movement had on desegregated schools. Discrimination include any distinction, exclusion, limitation on preference which, being based on race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, economic condition or birth, has the purpose or effect of nullifying or impairing equality of treatment in education (page 114). African and Hispanic have struggle almost half a century to try to desegregation schools. Many different groups such as “NAACP” demanded for equality of education in the school system. The U.S Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka shined a like on segregation. The year 1954, mark a change; Brown vs. BOE of …show more content…
This caused African Americans to boycott the Montgomery buses. After one year of boycotting, the Supreme Court ended segregation on the buses in Montgomery. Under the leadership of Dr. King, The Southern Christian Leadership Conference became the leading group in the civil rights struggle in 1957. Many national leaders worked to end segregation. The March on Washington, finally forced federal government to response on the issue of civil rights. The Civil Right Act of 1964, impacted voting rights, public accommodations, education, and employment in the United States. Titles 4 and 6 of the legislation were going to finally end segregated schools and provide authority for implementing the Brown decision (page 118). Southern schools didn’t end school segregation; desegregation schools in the north moved at slow pace. It was belied that the Brown decision was only applied to schools who state laws require segregated education. Courts begin ruling that Brown decision applied to all schools in the …show more content…
Mexican Americans demanded (Ontario, California) school board to allow for all transfers out of the segregated schools; the board refused. Many believed that this violated the 14th Amendment; school stated that segregation wasn’t based on race or national origins but on the necessity of providing special instruction (page 126). Mendez et al. vs Westminster School District of Orange County Mexican Americans declared not being Indians Americans, making segregation illegal in California in 1946. Segregation was illegal due the fact that it wasn’t required by state law and due to the fact that there was no valid educational justification for segregation. Many court cases came about due to the fact segregation was illegal now. In 195, the case of Hernandez vs. Texas U.S. Supreme Court recognizes Mexican Americans as a separate class for Americans who face discrimination; this led to the MALDEF in 1967.MALDEF deals with cases of civil rights activities; it had major implications for financing of schools across the country. Mexican American was finally recognized as an identifiable dominated group in the public schools due to the MALDEF. Mexican and Puerto Ricans demanded for public schools for more resource in the bilingual education. Mexican Americans wanted more of their culture seen in the schools; La Raza Unida took a stand on the rights of Mexican Americans and the preservation of their culture and language. “The

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