Jackson Economic Equality

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The “age of Jackson” did not advance economic equality rather it transformed American politics. Very few Americans had the right to vote until the 1820’s. Most states had restricted where only white males could have voted who were property owners or taxpayers or both. The restrictions put in place effectively stopped less affluent people from voting (Brinkley, 231). Ohio was one of the first changes, upon joining the union the constitution was adopted which guaranteed all adult white males had the right to vote and also gave voters the right to hold public office. Jackson believed in the equality of white mean and eventually, every state democratized its electorate to a degree. Despite the change, both women and blacks could not vote.
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Robert Hayne was a young senator from South Carolina he believed slowing down the growth to the west was a way way for the east keep its political and economical power. He wanted his stance to attract support from westerns in congress to lower the tariff he thought two regions might combine to defend themselves against tyranny (Brinkley,236), On the other hand a senator from Massachusetts and a Whig named Daniel Webster disagreed with Hayne. Hayne was coached by Calhoun he responded by saying “liberty and union, now and forever one and inseparable” (Brinkley,237) Jacksons response to this was that the federal union must be preserved this exchange between the two caused a rift between to important figures in the government Jackson and …show more content…
There were a number of events that fed the growing tension between nationalism and states’ rights. Tariff of Abominations was a significant event it was a tariff that protected the north but not the south. The south felt that the tariff was economically unconstitutional because it violated sates rights it passed due to new England’s favored high tariffs. The Webster Hayne debate was another event that fed the growing tension. Robert Hayne was a young senator from South Carolina he believed slowing down the growth to the west was a way way for the east keep its political and economical power. He wanted his stance to attract support from westerns in congress to lower the tariff he thought two regions might combine to defend themselves against tyranny (Brinkley,236), On the other hand a senator from Massachusetts and a Whig named Daniel Webster disagreed with Hayne. Hayne was coached by Calhoun he responded by saying “liberty and union, now and forever one and inseparable” (Brinkley,237) Jacksons response to this was that the federal union must be preserved this exchange between the two caused a rift between to important figures in the government Jackson and

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