The Impact Of Soviet Federalism On The Non-Russian People

790 Words 4 Pages
When we talk about the Soviet Union we immediately must talk about the following factors that apply to it. The first factor has to be the impact of Soviet federalism on the non-Russian peoples. The other factor is what the Soviet Union did to the surrounding countries. We will discuss whether or not the Soviet Union created nations, harmed nations, or both. Two important historians will help shape my argument and maybe even each other’s. Whether it was a positive or not, the fact of the matter is Soviet federalism had an impact on the non-Russian people. It is unclear what the relations were exactly during the early 1900’s although they appeared to be negative as the Soviet Union seemed to not care about the non-Russians. Kappler claimed …show more content…
Kappler argues that they never once tried to follow this; they simply did it to conquer and claim land. Brigit Braur supports Kapplers idea by stating, “The real reason for the mass deportation was an attempt by Moscow to destroy the Chechens.” This all happened during World War II which was during Stalin’s time. The soldiers of Russia came to the Chechens home, in which there was a celebration held for them, and later kicked the Chechens out of their home. It was a plot to help make sure nothing got in the way of Stalin’s mass collectivization. Lenin later did not agree with what Stalin did so he tried to right the wrong that was created. Kappler backs this up by saying, “Non-Russians were now once again able to make use of the USSR’s federal structure.” During the rise of the USSR, in the 1960’s particularly, the countries were allowed to have representatives that express their concerns. These concerns could then be taken to the center of power for the USSR. The Russians also allowed non-Russian people under the USSR rule to receive an education, …show more content…
I feel that Kappler said it best when he said, “The order of the new federal state was based upon territories defined by language and nationality.” He is clearly referring to the creation of countries. It went against the ideology of the communist movement and ignored the demographics of the Russian empire but was essential for the Soviet Union. They needed a new country, one other than Russia, to help show that they were a legitimate political power. The perfect example of this is brought up by Kappler when he said, “Not until 30 December, 1922 where areas controlled by the Bolsheviks (pre-Soviets) united to form a federal state.” The state would later be named the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics. It was through the creation of this state that they also redrew the boarders of Middle Asia. As a result nations were destroyed or lost land. Nations were also created as a result of this redrawing of boarders. Its important to mention that all of this came after the return to the federalist principle. Another example of the destruction of nations is when Russia destroyed the Chechens land. Brauer expresses this by saying, “The deteriorating relations between Checens and Russian leadership, culminating in two wars in the 1990’s, have involuntarily turned Kazakhstan again into a place of exile 50 years later.” Basically Russia and the Chechens never once

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