Political And Social Effects Of The American Revolution Dbq

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In 1775, the thirteen British colonies on the east coast of North America did something very bold. They began to fight for their independence. Fighting went on for eight more years until the Americans and British signed the Treaty of Paris in 1783. The American Revolution caused the Americans to reassess the politics, society, and economy in their young country. Americans didn’t want a government that resembled the British monarchial rule at all, but they would soon find out that they would need a strong centralized government. Socially, women, slaves, and Loyalists were mainly affected. Economically, Americans were not affected greatly, but poor farmers protested the high taxes imposed upon them, which became known as Shay’s Rebellion. The idea of King George III and his idea of an absolute monarchy was not appealing to the colonists at all. The Articles of Confederation were created so there was no national executive branch, there was no president. Additionally, the Articles essentially gave no power to the government so it could not raise any money through taxes and it lacked the authority to maintain a standing army. Document G serves as an account of the chaos occurring during this time. Abigail Adams writes to Thomas Jefferson “..they have …show more content…
Politically, the Revolution impacted the way we wanted our government to be structured. At first Americans didn’t want a government that looked like the one that oppressed and taxed them for so long, they learned that they needed a strong centralized government with checks and balances. Economically, the Revolution impacted whether the country should be agricultural or should it focus on manufacturing. Socially, the Revolution impacted slaves because prohibited slavery was no longer ideology, it was reality. Overall, the American Revolution sparked a change in all three of these areas and resulted in a shift in American

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