Evolution Of Popular Culture In The 1930's

Improved Essays
The world of popular culture has greatly evolved throughout history in that various innovations have allowed for the incorporation of new ideas and phenomena into society. From the creation of the first motion pictures to the progression of professional sports, America has seen magnificent transformations in the field of entertainment. Such elements of culture have been especially important when the nation is struggling, much like it was during the Great Depression of the 1930’s. It was at this time that the underprivileged of America were forced into debt and economic decline, causing them to turn to popular culture for a distraction from the turmoil being faced.

The 1930’s in America was a time of economic distress and chaos. Unemployment rates skyrocketed as citizens were dragged into debt, and people were made to migrate from their homes as storms of the Dust Bowl ruined agricultural opportunities. The population could be found in a world of barren earth and broken dreams, an era many believed to be “the final destruction of the old Jeffersonian idea of agrarian harmony with nature” (“Dust
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In truth, however, although the globe has undergone extreme evolutions in the world of entertainment, people still refer back to the culture of the 1930’s and the everlasting impact the artists of the era have created. The ability of 1930’s popular culture to distract citizens from the unrest America was facing remains an incredible aspect of the nation’s history. Many people were hungry, homeless, and completely bankrupt at this unfortunate point in the past, but they were nevertheless able to enjoy the elements of Great Depression entertainment that ultimately transformed the era’s

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