The Impact Of Humanism In The Middle Ages

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When speaking to the the humanistic movement during the Middle Ages, historian Martin McGuire stated, "It set a basic pattern for the future". After the devastation of the Black Plague from the late 1200s to the mid 1300s, Europe was in great need of rebuilding both socially and economically. Many people turned to religion, while others strayed away from the spiritual outlook, believing that the solutions to the world’s problems lie in human thought and action rather than divine intervention. These people were called humanists, and their movement involved a focus on individually driven educational practices. Humanist writers such as Dante and Petrarch created literature that reflected their views on the world. They saw life as more than religious and societal rules. Humanists began to question many aspects of the Catholic Church: its values, theories, beliefs, and control, leading to changes and transitions in European society. These …show more content…
All of these effects contributed to the beneficial transformation of European society. The previous control of the Papacy in the Middle Ages was restraining to the growth of Europe. With the rise of humanism and subsequent heresies, the European communities and individuals were empowered to stand in defiance of Papal authority. Developments in art, mirrored this transition from religion to a more individualized way of life. While the Church had previously denoted the curriculums and schooling, the rise of humanism contributed to the increase of educational opportunities. The development of universities, and the establishment of the humanities, along with other factors gave rise to humanism. Ultimately, this movement gave the European population strength to stray from their societal expectations. This resulted in the rebirth that people today call the

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