Relationship Between Globalization And Imperialism

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Globalization is said to be “ a tendency of businesses; technologies, or philosophies to spread throughout the world”. An European honed practice, that by historian estimations began in 1492, when Christopher Columbus stumbled on the Americas. This event was later followed by Vasco Da Gama in 1498, when he made an end run trip around Africa, acquiring monopoly rents from spice traders. Though many do choose to believe that globalization spanned far prior to all this. Europeans always seem to take precedence whenever the conversation arises about globalization, and this can be attributed to their ideologies and motives they are driven by. “God, Glory and Gold”, the “3 G’s” is a common European belief, which justifies their purpose on this earth …show more content…
While the source illustrates that historical globalization is a critical issue. One perspective may state that the ideological perspectives of globalization and imperialism embraces negativity to a large extent, as it idealizes Eurocentrism and racism, which is drenched in their actions. Accompanied also by the act of stripping away the land of the very people that have been fostered by it. Similarly, one could say that imperialism and globalization embraces a positive side of the argument, as it was an economical exploitation that help propel and aid the nations that it served. And also politically, as it helps root power and government for the imperial power, to allow a word and influence over these nations seen inferior or lacking. Despite its positives, imperialism and globalization weigh heavier on the negative side, also presented by the source. The imperialist endeavors crippled nations and cultures, even leading to the extinction of some, and stripped them of sovereign rights to their own land, in the process. Actions that fed on those seen supposedly inferior and or different to the “white man’s …show more content…
European nations sought out to explore and capture these lands in any means necessary for the benefit of the home county. Means that usually involved the slaughtering of million, the act of deportation, severely depopulating some lands and taking advantage of its raw materials and human work force. Following the abolishment of slavery in Africa in 1833, imperial powers sought out other means of labour that would substitute the need to resort to slavery. India later on became a target, and was soon recognized for indentured labour, by taking advantage of its poverty stricken and desperate people. Fleets were sent to India, and was taken control of by Portuguese and later on British powers. Before labour could be acquired, the independent nation of India was soon swept into the political dominance of European powers. With that came benefits, which were exploited of, including spices: cardamom, pepper, turmeric and more; also cotton, which established India as an important piece, in particular Britain’s market. All of which yielded clothing, raw materials and spices that were of high demand back in Europe. A political establishment, did lead to an economical gain for Britain, but left the people of India helpless and crumbling. The nation’s own economy took a plunge. Businesses and other industries began to wither. The dominance of cotton plants, instead of

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