The Impact Of Buddhism On East Asia

1307 Words 5 Pages
Buddhism was founded by Siddhartha Gautama in “India around 525” (Helble 1 ) also known as Buddha. Buddhism “spread from India along the commercial roads, most importantly the Silk Road, to China, Mongolia, Korea and Japan” (Helble 1). Soon, the adaptable religion made its way to East Asia particularly in China, Korea, and Japan. Coincidentally first Buddhism spread from India to China, China to Korea, and lastly Korea to Japan. This paper will argue that Buddhism has had a positive influence on East Asia through lifestyle and trade. Lifestyle will be assessed through viewing the impact of improving quality of life and providing flexibility for individuals. Trade will be assessed by seeing how Buddhism provided for expanding relations …show more content…
. . the first monumental architecture . . . [and] its missionaries brought literacy” (Seth 5). Influencing a society’s sculpting and architecture provides learning new techniques and methods to build things thus, by trying new methods you are improving the craft and skill of the members in society. Secondly, by missionaries bringing literacy it allows a society to progress and bring awareness of gaining knowledge. Furthermore, meditation in temples “were an important outlet for those who found the obligations and pressures of everyday life too strong” (Seth 5), Buddhist temples provided an environment for Korean people to dismiss their worries and seek serenity. As people would go to temples individuals would inevitably see others there thus, it opens the door for communication and builds bond within …show more content…
By creating a demand in the East Asian countries for imported religious articles, it keeps the need for continuous interaction with other countries existent. Furthermore, trade creates dialogue for importing and exporting resources. Through import and export a country gains more resources and autonomy. The country is then able to make use of one’s natural resources which in turn, equates to bringing profit for a country and strength in the economy. Buddhism facilitated “foreign exchange by overcoming narrow local prejudice with a radically more cosmopolitan, international perspective” (Holcombe 280). The concept of foreign exchange was used to overcome people’s prejudice by using the viewpoint of cosmopolitan regions which was successful since trade with different countries and ethnicities started to become a norm as trade progressed. Therefore not only did Buddhism positively influence trade to flourish between regions and countries, it subliminally normalized trust between nations and various races. Subsequently an overlooked area where trade occurred was none other than in Buddhist monasteries in East Asia, specifically in

Related Documents