Sociocultural Education

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Throughout this course we have learned different ways children think, learn and display actions. The topic that most stood out was the rethinking disability and special education from a sociocultural perspective, which has a benefit on students in the school setting. Various authors have preformed and analyzed studies that display a range of benefits to help students strive in the school setting, which relates to the working world. Van Hees, Moyson and Roevers (2015) discuss Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) with regards to the challenges that individuals are faced with and the benefits the school setting that correlates with the students’ parents and support systems. Kim and Dymond (2010) have studied the concept school’s play as an essential …show more content…
Ashby (2012) studied a program that started in the early 1990s that incorporated inclusive elementary and special education teachers. The programs value was promoting both excellence and equality in the schooling for students. This is a very important value that can be used interchangeably due to the fact that you always want your students and peers to strive for the best and challenge themselves in creative ways. In the classroom setting having a judge-free zone is very important because having others react to certain situations can impact a child’s emotional state and have more barriers on their learning experience than benefits (Tarulli, D., January 28, 2016. Lecture #4, Brock University). The shared values that were mentioned in the article were also guiding principles used in the program as a development process. The shared values are inclusion and equity, teacher as a decision maker, multiculturalism, motivation in an education setting and field-based emphasis that can be used in a hands on approach to teaching (Ashby, 2012). Every student’s disability is different due to the fact that they can be born with it or displayed later in life, but all special education programs benefit students in one way or …show more content…
Van Hees, Moyson and Roevers (2015) have studied the benefits with students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are more common in the United States of American than one would expect. One in sixty-eight children have ASD and some of the benefits of a special education are having a stronger memory, dedication and willingness to listen to others. Kim and Dymond (2010) had observed and found results that participating and encouraging school play is an essential role in preparing students for employment that can correlate to learning new skills in the school setting. Also, they found out that special education teachers strongly stand by the curriculum and the strategies used in their classroom greatly impact their students. These findings from the previous article relate to the article written by Ashby (2012) due to the fact that disabilities are not always presented as a definition of a person and inclusive special education programs share common values such as multiculturalism, motivation in education and the teacher as the decision maker. Hanuskek, Kain and Rivkin (1998) found that special education programs further the academic achievement of students that can transfer into social skills as well. Drame and Kamphoff (2014) research shows that teaching

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