The Hypocrisy Of Slavery

1249 Words 5 Pages
Despite common opinion, freedom is not an inherently given right. The metal of this world is recurrently forged into weapons and shackles of tyranny, oppression, and marginalization which are used to cripple the hopelessly weak so they may more obediently serve the indomitably powerful. The roars of war between freedom and slavery echo throughout the timeline of recorded human history, and two men, whose words carry the truth of light-bringers with the passion of prophets, know this theatre of conflict better than anyone. Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King Jr. gave two speeches, “The Hypocrisy of American Slavery” and “I Have a Dream” respectively, which passionately and effectively rejected the ideals of racial inequality in the United …show more content…
As the United States is currently in a state of jarring transition, fear and unfettered reactions are becoming commonplace, and violence is predicted to follow. However, there still remains a hope for peaceful resolutions in these unstable times, and the words of Martin Luther King are primed to initiate a more civilized discussion. The contemporary impact of this speech is undoubtedly ingrained into the hearts, minds, and schedules of the American people. Every year, on the third Monday of January, Americans around the country celebrate the achievements and sacrifice of this man, and they prepare themselves to continue his work so that his dream can one day be called reality. Throughout the decades, King’s words have inspired rallies, protests, and marches all with the goal of peacefully continuing his cause and seeing the fruition of his vision. “I Have a Dream” is a speech that not only incited a social revolution, but did so in manner of such grace and peace that its message has lasted and will continue to last for generations to …show more content…
While the words of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech are undoubtedly inspirational, their impact on the conduct of the United States is, for the most part, only seen through symbolic gestures and holidays. Douglass’ efforts begat tangible results: a measurable change in the general attitudes about slavery in the minds of the public and slavery’s eventual, tumultuously enforced abolition. Both men were great champions of their cause, but King could only warm a heart; Douglass could light a

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