The Human Problem Of War By Sebastian Junger

2212 Words 9 Pages
Look at chapter 2“War is a big and sprawling word that brings a lot of human suffering into the conversation, but combat is a different matter. Combat is the smaller game that young men fall in love with, and any solution to the human problem of war will have to take into account the psyches of these young men” (Junger 2011, p. 234). Sebastian Junger, the author of War (2011), was born in Belmont, Massachusetts and grew up to become an award-winning journalist and #1 New York Times Bestselling author. His other novels include The Perfect Storm, Fire, A Death in Belmont, and Tribe. Junger is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair, a correspondent at ABC News, and has covered international stories around the world. In 1980, Junger graduated from …show more content…
He witnessed the effect war has on soldiers, the importance of brotherhood, and what it means to fight and serve. Junger spoke in Massachusetts at a WGBH Forum after his book was released and explains that, “I wanted to know what it was like to be a soldier in combat. It doesn’t change much from war to war, from century to century, and I wanted to understand it” (WGBHForum). He describes how civilians think of war in a political aspect in comparison to the soldiers, who are the only individuals that do not think of war in political terms; they are focused on surviving and making it through each day. Throughout the novel, Junger separates his experience into three topics: Fear, Killing, and Love, however, connects them with the bonds that are formed between soldiers during …show more content…
He explains that “combat [jams] so much adrenaline through your system that fear was rarely an issue; far more indicative of real courage was how you felt before the big operations, when the implications of losing your life really had a chance to sink in” (p.74). He recognized that everyone got scared at some point during their deployment, however, soldiers do not want to show it. If they show, they could potentially put their brothers at risk. Another way soldiers put their brother in risk is by letting exhaustion take over their mind. If a soldier gives in to exhaustion and gives up, they are not prepared to die for the men to their left and right. This was a huge deal for second platoon because “if you slow down a patrol, the enemy has time to get into position and then someone gets shot” (p.77). Throughout Junger’s experience in the Korengal Valley, he witnessed killings that changed

Related Documents