Laissez Faire And Social Darwinism

Better Essays
In 1892, corporations and business’ were booming due to recent transitions into an industrial society. The transcontinental railroad was allowing nationwide interaction and corporations were ascending. With the ideology of laissez-faire and social Darwinism, the government was not intervening with any inequalities of the time. Business’ were taking complete advantage and workers suffered severely long work days with little profit. Besides few, farmers were struggling due to high tariffs, crop prices dropping, and money shortages. Those in the lower end of society were feeling hopeless. The rich acquired all that they could, and the cost of living was impossible for some to keep up with. Finally, when the union declined the increased production …show more content…
The government not involving in the highs and lows of society is what led to this chaotic event. With business’ solely concerned with corporations profiting by over 100% in the sake of society, workers were angered. The government abiding to the ideology of laissez-faire meaning not taking control of this situation allowed for this severe inequality to continue. Finally, the strikes broke out. Social Darwinism and laissez-faire is what allowed the economy and specifically workers to fall beyond repair. Change was desperately needed which would involve the government intervening. This strike clearly symbolizes the growing frustrations between labor and management. The workers were taken advantage of and ripped apart by management who was greedy and selfish. This strike screams frustration because the workers just could not do it any longer. They were simply unable to keep up with the inequality which would be extremely frustrating. After so long of dealing with managements greed and the attempted break, their frustration was excruciatingly high. The workers and lower class had absolutely no say in how management was robbing them. The workers knew they deserved acceptable work hours, pay that would allow to live, job security, and more. An influential leader in the mill, Thomas Williamson, was on the Advisory Committee while the strike took place. Williamson believed the …show more content…
On the contrary, management believed they had the power to short these rights because it was their business. They were continuing to make money and it was viewed as success to the owners. To reinforce the ideology of laissez faire, the prosperous will succeed while the incapable plummet, which is exactly what was happening. The Homestead Lockout and Strike occurred during America’s transition into an industrial society. The outcome of this strike affected working conditions greatly over the course of the next century. When the strike lost momentum and the union eventually broke, Carnegie steel quickly took advantage of their win and instituted longer work days with less pay. . Some consequences of this strike can still be seen today in America’s businesses such as workers’ working very hard for their pay and not receiving an adequate earning. According to pbsu.edu, “Dan Kinney, once a machinist and then a roller at the Braddock Works, told of the relation between hard work and mechanical improvements: ‘This mill has not been changed. The roller 's work is the same as it was thirty years ago…The output has greatly increased, but the work per ton has not proportionately decreased. In most departments the men are working much harder today than they were ten years ago and wages have

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Blodget wrote in an article “Because we are facing a very similar economic problem as the country did in the early 20th century. A glut of labor was allowing companies to pay a pittance for a day 's work, leaving most of their dedicated employees destitute. Business owners and executives (the equivalent of today 's 1%) did fine, but most rank-and-file workers did not. And this lack of spending power in the middle class crimped overall economic growth. Because we are facing a very similar economic problem as the country did in the early 20th century.…

    • 1179 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Union jobs were once the backbone of our workforce. Many different trades offered employees the opportunity to join unions, ensuring that these employees received the highest wages, the best benefits and safe working conditions. With more and more jobs being outsources overseas and the Baby Boomer generation retiring, the amount of people joining the unions has decreased. In order for unions to survive, they are going to have to change the way today’s generation sees them, to bring new life back into a struggling industry. In order to find out why union participation is struggling, let’s take a look back at how unions started.…

    • 2013 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Bull Market Boom Dbq

    • 1774 Words
    • 8 Pages

    This caused the Great Depression since the cost of everything was down, businesses could not make money. Farmers started to go bankrupt since they had not made any money, and still had too many crops left. Furthermore, because businesses had overproduce, they had to lay off some workers. Notably, it was said in “If Hoover Fails,” by Elmer Davis, “Production slackened, workmen were laid off, until the… surplus was used up” (Document 10). This shows that overproduction was a cause of this depression since it was getting people fired.…

    • 1774 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Frustrated with the state of their lives, the unskilled working class grew more and more discontent, noticing that their countries were so wealthy while they lived in poverty. This frustration lead to an inevitable contempt for the upper classes who many saw as their oppressors. The problem, as they saw it, was obviously not wealth; there was plenty of that. The problem lay in its even distribution, or lack thereof. True justice for industrial workers like themselves meant the impartial dispersal of capital.…

    • 1480 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Labor unions were formed by workers who disliked the way corporations were run. Workers disliked how unsafe their jobs were and how little they were getting paid, they formed unions as a voice to state their thoughts. They sought to make changes such as limiting the amount of time they can work, an age minimum to work, and several other things to improve working conditions. In the end, labor unions became official and big businesses had no choice but to provide their employees with their demands. (source) Living conditions during this time were difficult as well.…

    • 726 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Many reform movements tried to go after them, often expressing public outrage. However, the machines stayed unopposed mainly due to the reform movements not lasting that long. This hurt the working class the most mainly due to the fact that they can not make reforms without help from the government; and the corruption of the government stops them from any changes. Throughout the second industrial revolution in America there are many advances. Some in technological advancements and some in social.…

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The workers were made to work in unsafe conditions, long hours, and all for little to no pay. Child labor was at an all-time high, children were having to quit school and working to help support their families. The government was run by big businesses and the federal government did nothing about it. Government officials were taking money from business owners, and in return they would pass laws that would benefit individual businesses. This caused other businesses to suffer and this was not fair to them.…

    • 838 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The previously mentioned “grumblings” from disgruntled employees was only overheard by the new HR representative, which makes it apparent in the case study that the employees do not trust management enough to approach them directly. This really comes as no surprise when the President of the company is overheard, “yelling again in his office about paying too much for lazy, unmotivated employees.” (Doohickeys Case Study) Ultimately, without employee representation, Doohickeys is losing money. They are losing money because they are missing out on opportunities for increased production with employees who are driven by fairness, representation, and respect. In the case study it goes on, “He explains that some employees have been complaining about the lack of overtime pay.” (Doohickeys Case Study) This lack of overtime pay comes from a clearly mismanaged work schedule where employees are required to work overtime during the week, and then record it as if it was worked a different week so it doesn’t appear on the time cards. This is a blatant disregard for the needs of employees and needs to be corrected by finding ways to…

    • 1236 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Workers, Populist, and Progressives During the 19th Century workers were dissatisfied with the capitalist government, and the new industrial order. Industrialization, urbanization, and immigration were modifying the American society following reconstruction. From this discontent, sprouted two new ideologies which are the Populist and Progressives. Workers suffered terrible conditions, and it was difficult for them to be heard since there were more workers than jobs. Because of this, workers were always taking the job opportunities quickly and the capitalists had no reason to make changes to the industry.…

    • 1042 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Every word that was spoken about them was a lie. He only made the labor unions look like they were the “bad guys”. First of all, he once spoke out about scab workers, which are replacements for workers who do not show up to work because they were on strike, yet he used scab workers himself. Like I said in the paragraph above, the workers would go on strike because they were not satisfied with their low wages and working conditions which were still bad in Carnegie’s steel factories. Secondly, Carnegie pushed for all his companies, factories, and businesses to have non-union workers.…

    • 1269 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays