Dr. Martin Luther King's Beyond Brown: Full History

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Segregation and the war against it have both been a major part of the American history and is still in our present. This war against segregation-that Dr. Martin Luther King-who of course was not the only person, who emphasized on it in the year 1954-has sadly not gained any wide success. In America today, many schools are still in acquaintance with this policy because some see it to have positive impacts when contrary to their thoughts, both the minorities and majorities in one way or the other get affected by it.
For purposes of this present discussion, segregation refers to the restriction of opportunities from a class of people belonging to a particular race, religion, national or geographic origin, which results from or is supported by
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This article gives a brief summary of the situations of classrooms till the enactment of Brown v Board of Education case of 1954. Brown v. Board of Education was the landmark case which declared the separation of black and white schools unconstitutional. For a long time, the black Americans inured a life of abject poverty, maltreatment, inequality and injustice. The quest for fairness, love and justice led them on to fight for their rights. The famous Plessy V ferguson case of 1896 which was behind the ‘separate but equal’ decision, may or may not have been effective in the country because racial segregation still lingered on in some states. “In 1950, public schools in Prince Edward County, VA, were still as segregated as they could be: while white students spent their days in clean classrooms with new books and equipment, black students in the county were crammed into crumbling, overcrowded schools stocked with hand-me-down books.” (PBS). The black Americans may have won two cases which annulled segregation but there have been evidences that the country is more segregated than it was 50 years ago. This fight by the black americans for not just ‘separate and equal’ but desegregation and integration is still a work in progress hoping to get wide

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