The History Of Kennedy Assassination

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Each person’s memory thinking back to November 22, 1963 may be slightly different. Maybe they were on their way to a big event or on their way to run a simple errand but, everyone will forever remember the 22 of November as the day one of America’s most beloved presidents was assassinated. The assassination of President John F. Kennedy will forever remain one of America’s greatest mysteries. Through collective memory, individual memory and the power of the media though, this day will be forever kept in many Americans minds. The year was 1963 my grandparents, Sandy and Charlie O’Donnell, were both in young and in their 20s at the time. Although they are each in their 70s now – they still remember this like it was yesterday. My grandmother, …show more content…
This is because of how quickly information was being relayed to the public during this shocking time in our nations history. Reporters were doing everything they could to give information quickly and more important that was accurate. Our nations collective memory from this day is preserved through iconic photos, newspapers, magazines, and of course live footage. Zelizer states that “these moments – captured by the media in various form – have been replayed as markers of the nation’s collective memory” whenever the Kennedy assassination is remember (Zelizer, 5). Some of the key images that people remember today when thinking of the assassination are Lee Harvey Oswald getting shot, Jackie and Caroline Kennedy kneeling in front of JFK’s coffin and of course the iconic image of John-John Kennedy saluting his father one final time. Without even bringing up collective memory or asking about the funeral my grandmother had said “well there’s that photo of John-John saluting his father at the funeral”. She remembers that moment of collective memory so clearly because it has been made published or talked about countless …show more content…
Although most believe the answer to the question of “who killed President Kennedy” is Lee Harvey Oswald. There are some that would whole heartily disagree. Such as, Jim Garrison the District Attorney for New Orleans. Garrison fully believed that the Warren Commission had failed the American public and did not conduct a proper investigation in regards to the Kennedy assassination. He believes there were huge missing pieces evidence and that “our federal intelligence agencies are implacably determined to do whatever is necessary to block any further inquiry into the facts of the assassination.” (Brener). Garrison, as well as the American public, was hunger for answers about who could have been reasonable for this unspeakable

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