Non-Canonical Literature

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In 2015, a group of New Testament scholars, Ben C. Blackwell, John K. Goodrich, and Jason Maston compiled a published book that presents the historical context of Romans through the literature that was present at the time of the composition of the Roman epistle, namely, the Second Temple Judaism era. Plenty of Bible scholars, such as John Piper, study the Bible by only using canonical Bible. Dr. Blackwell, Dr. Goodrich, and Dr. Maston, on the other hand, provided non-canonical literature to provide context. Through providing multiple articles that include insights regarding non-canonical literature, the editors of the book are able to present Romans to the audience in light of a fuller context since the audience would now have an understanding …show more content…
They do not attempt to defend the authenticity of Romans; rather, they assume that the reader has a belief in its authenticity since, for example, they included theology that believers widely accept. Additionally, they critically examined certain theological concepts in light of the contextual literature of the day of Romans. Furthermore, they expected that the students have an understanding of these theological concepts. Therefore, they compiled their book with their minds on students who know theological concepts, believe the Scriptures to be valuable toward theology, and view Scripture, specifically Romans, within its historical and cultural …show more content…
17). Each chapter discussed a portion of Romans in chronological order. For instance, the chapters 1-3 discussed were concerning the first two chapters of Romans. Chapter 1 discussed Christology. Moreover, in this chapter they discussed contributions of the literature, Psalms of Solomon, towards the Messiah as the Davidic Ruler, the Messiah as the Eschatological Agent, the Messiah’s Eternal Sonship, and the Messiah’s Subjugation of Gentiles (pgs. 33-35). Chapter 2 discussed the manner of God’s treatment towards humanity, especially the Israelites. Specifically, the editors discussed, in light of the literature known as the Wisdom of Solomon, God’s just judgment, Israel’s distinction from sinful, and Israel’s inclusion among sinful humanity (pgs. 39-42). Through these subheadings, they presented God’s justice in His wrath towards all humanity and in His Gospel. In addition, they spoke concerning Israel: although Israel differs from all humanity since they were not idolatrous because they worshiped the true living God, they are still a part of humanity’s sinful history. Finally, chapter 3 presented the point of view of the Jews regarding circumcision and the law. Jubilees, the

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