The Hidden Harm Of Antidepressants Analysis

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Throughout the article “The Hidden Harm of Antidepressants,” Diana Kwon, journalist for Scientific American, discusses the threats antidepressants pose for those who use it. Antidepressants are the “most commonly prescribed medications” in the medical world. While antidepressants have a wide variety of users, many are unaware of their risks. These risks include an increase in suicidal thoughts, as well as suicide, and an increase in aggressive behavior. The reason that most people are unaware of these risks is because clinical trials do not report these behaviors; they withhold this information from the “medical community and the public.” The directors in Brave New World also conceal information about a drug that can be paralleled to antidepressants; …show more content…
They are referred to as “useless” and being “all in your head” (Kramer 1) when, in fact, many patients claim that antidepressants help them with their disease or disorder. Some psychologists claim that antidepressants’ disposition will only effectively treats patients with severe depression. It is nearly impossible to constrict the amount of people who use antidepressants to only those with serious depression because people are known to exaggerate their symptoms. This includes, especially, those who unknowingly receive a placebo and show a promising recovery. Antidepressants are used for more than just depression. They not only work for episodes of “mild or moderate depression;” they also help those who feel despair. The drug can, however, use the placebo effect to cause a patient believe that they are getting better when, in fact, nothing is happening. Psychologist Robert DeRubeis concluded that the antidepressant lift could be “all in your head” (Kramer 1). The reason some people question antidepressants is because “subjects who don’t really have depression are included” in the experiments. However, not all those who use antidepressants are suffering from severe depression. Many of these types of people are susceptible to common symptoms of depression that can be fixed with

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