The Harlem Renaissance Era Analysis

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There are many black writers who have been interested in the cause of the cultural emancipation of the African Americans. They also had a stand against the slavery system and the unjust American society. Resultantly, that Harlem became the sacred place of the Negro and the center of the black community in America.
The Harlem community becames the center and the Godfather for African American people.
Many stories of protest and struggle were written by writers and black critics, some of them autobiographical because they lived in social injustice and enslavement at that time. Actually, they challenged all beliefs, and the cultural values, ideas of beauty, ugliness and White-made social problems of the Black people. According to Steven Watson exposes that:

The Harlem Renaissance era is full of different literary forms such as short stories, plays, novels, poems and essays, where most of these works were about the suffering of blacks and how to retrieve their
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He also protested the execution of Negroes outside of Jim crow Laws and Racial discrimination in all aspects of life, including education and employment. Whereas his case included Africans and Asians in the colonies in general. Moreover, was a proponent of Pan-Africanism by holding African conferences for the independence of the African colonies from the injustice of the European powers.

On the other hand, he was sympathetic to socialist issues throughout his life. For this reason he worked as an activist in the application of peace and the rejection of racism against Negroes. "W. E. B." Du Bois believes that the main reason for racism against Negroes is capital. In the same field he worked intensively on the enactment of the Civil Rights in the United

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