The Harlem Renaissance: An Analysis

Improved Essays
African Americans have been through trying times in which some people would not have been resilient to make it. To come out of bondage and make a firm stance in the literary era is phenomenal. Since studying several periods, the literature of Harlem Rennaisance has had the most profound impression on me. The Harlem Renaissance was a blossoming time of African Amerian culture. African Americans were some of the most creative individuals that embraced, music, liberal arts, poetry and dramatic artwork.
According to Gates & Smith (2014), As far as the arts, music, and dance were concerned, this was a brilliant moment in the history of African Americans. The book asserts, this was a time of achievement never before experienced. African Americans
…show more content…
This time set the groundwork for artists to come. African Americans were equally gifted in the literary field as any other. During this period, publishing houses opened their doors to black authors. African Americans were excited because they thought this case would help to revolutionize race relations while enhancing their understanding of each other.
Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Alaine Locke were a few prominent names associated with the Harlem Renaissance movement. A common theme in which these three artists portrayed was black identity. While growing up, I did not read half of these stories; I guess that is why I am so infatuated with them. During my school years African American studies were minimally taught.
I enjoyed Zora Neale Hurston feminist view, for which she was not afraid to speak about the issues that affected African American women. Zora was the voice of many who was eclectic and unique. She gave the world two choices love me or hate me. She was optimitic and hopeful that life would get better. After leaving her home town of Eatonville in which she saw life through rosy glases. She discovered that she was indeed a brown girl who is proud of her dark skin. There was nothing shameful or tragic about being Black; she stated

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    During the Harlem Renaissance, writers prospered with ideas that had a great influence on both Blacks and Whites. Also, it was by literature where the Blacks expressed themselves greatly. Many of the writers during the Harlem Renaissance showed what the Blacks are capable of, and how great the Blacks can be if given the opportunity. Although it was considered to be difficult to portray a positive image for the Negro during this period, the Harlem Renaissance succeeded in changing how the Whites view the Blacks (Rhodes, nd). Harlem Renaissance is considered a great movement that had an influence to the people how they view the Blacks, which later helped end discrimination against Blacks.…

    • 1034 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The black culture became prosperous during the Harlem Renaissance through their music, art, and poetry and with this it caused for the black community to be highly respected. Along with this, many components played a role in the blossoming time of the Harlem Renaissance and the benefits it came with. During the Civil Rights Movement African Americans faced many struggles and lived very tough lives…

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This proved to be a huge milestone for African Americans. The black population really needed one person to have the confidence to step up and fight for what was right. In a religious aspect, Howard Thurman was their savior. On another cultural idea, such a music, there were many emergents for African Americans during this time. Music, especially jazz, had a great outbreak in this decade, mainly because it was the Roaring Twenties, and this was not only a time for money but a time for music.…

    • 1562 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    African Americans began getting so much recognition that they became the influence of songs. Poems written by African American people were being used as lyrics in these songs. Roland Hayes was looked upon like no other black had been. He was a widely known figure who had studied and practiced music a lot as a child. He later began his career and ultimately gave a name for African Americans in the music industry (“Harlem Renaissance”).…

    • 2291 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    "The Harlem Renaissance": Influence on The Black community. The 1900s in are seen as one of the most time periods in U.S. History ever, from the Wright brothers constructing the first airplane to the first movie theater. it was especially meaningful for the African American People, numerous events took place during the 1900s that changed black culture, but the most influential of them all was the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance was a culmination of change in attitude and a shift from philosophy of white domination to demanding equal status and rights for blacks. The Harlem Renaissance was so influential in fact, that it still affects Generations today.…

    • 1450 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    She took pride in the African-American culture and the practices of the people from the south that retains some of Africa in it. Hurston uses a lot of references to this traditional way of living and rituals in her works in order to tell others that she is not ashamed of her roots and neither should they be. Rather, they should have self-pride as well as racial pride (black pride). This can be seen in one of her novels, “Their Eyes Were Watching God”, where Nanny tells Janie about not just self-dignity and pride but of a pride that comes out of being a black woman. She asks Janie to make use of the opportunities and be proud of her heritage, something that she could not do herself.…

    • 1639 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Women are Powerful The Harlem Renaissance was a ground breaking time period full of artistic development in literature, fine arts, theatre, and music. The African Americans in the United States grew in popularity but still many civil rights problems were still occurring. Many great people from all around gathered and made a difference in the United States and fought for what they believed in. Times started to change and the African American population knew that they had to take a stand. They were able to do that in their poems, art, or songs that they created.…

    • 1567 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance was a time when the African American community flourished. It was a time of great discovery, mostly in the arts. Many wonderful African American poets, authors, musicians, and artists emerged during this period and are still highly regarded to this day. Those that rose up created a voice for the African American community, and paved the path for others to join them. The explosion of cultural pride during the Harlem Renaissance led to social change for African American rights and pride all throughout America from powerful and compelling musicians, artists, and writers.…

    • 877 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance

    • 1482 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Harlem Renaissance was a movement of social and artistic advancement that defined an era for African-Americans, not only in the United States, but around the world. The movement also laid the foundations for an entirely different future for African-Americans living in the United States. However, this racial progress would not have been possible without the imaginative genius that grew from writers, poets, and playwrights within the African-American communities. Among these historic figures was the “O. Henry of Harlem” (New York Times, 1967), Langston Hughes, accomplished poet, novelist, playwright, essayist and an all-around artistic master.…

    • 1482 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance represented the birth of a new beginning of freedom and identity for the black artists. Following the Great Migration, blacks began to form black communities and the level of confidence in themselves and their culture. Blacks became active, known and self-assertive. Through the arts, the idea of a new type of proud, self-accepting Negro was constantly expressed. This is revealed in Zora Neale Hurston’s writing, because she uses Southern vernacular as well as Harlem slang, to the disdain of other African American authors.…

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays