The Han Dynasty

691 Words 3 Pages
In the 3rd century B.C.E. Rome, a republic and the dominant state on the Italian peninsula, emerged as a new Mediterranean power. When Rome became a city-state, the people were mostly farmers. The early Romans spoke Latin. They borrowed elements of culture from Sicily and the Italian coast. The ideas contributed included planning, gold and bronze, gods and goddesses, and arch building technology. They also set up a Greek style government. Rome became a major center of the Hellenistic culture that went out across the western Mediterranean and Europe. When Rome became a city-state, social tension was already there. The wealthy sat with the senate while everyone else were known as plebs. A social and political system that let people have power …show more content…
The Qin accomplished a series of conquests, first ending the Zhou dynasty, and took over the other six of the Seven Warring States to gain control over the whole of China. The Han dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China period. The Han Dynasty was the ruling family of China from 206 BCE to 220 BCE. A leader named Liu Bang founded the new dynasty. Sinification is the spread within East Asia. It was a style of social and cultural life in China. The southward expansion of the Han dynasty is a series of military of South China and Northern Vietnam. Military growth to the south began with Qin dynasty and continued during the Han dynasty. The Xiongnu state inhabited their wealth in livestock by trading their farmers and town dwellers. Horse breeding became the core of the Xiongnu empire. As the empire grew, it grew on the rich ecological zones. The Parthian Empire was a major Iranian political and cultural power in ancient Iran and Iraq. The Parthian Empire stretched from the northern reaches of the Euphrates to eastern Iran. The empire became a center of trade and commerce. The Kushana empire was east of the Parthian …show more content…
They started as Inner Eurasian nomads. They settled in Bactria. The warriors tapped farm and artisan wealth from the Amu Darya of Central Asia. After decades of ruling Nubia and Egypt, the royal court moved from the Nile city of Napata to a new capital at Meroe. It was far enough south of the Sahara Desert to keep grain and cotton farming from rainfall. When gravity shifted, the cultural interchange with Egypt weakened. Influences that faded was art, architecture and religion. Nubian merchants shipped ironware, cotton, gold, ivory, and slaves downriver. They then imported Mediterranean wine, olive oil and ceramics. A small structure in Naqa was known as A Temple of

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