The Hadrianic Baths: The Romanisation Of The Roman Empire

1134 Words 5 Pages
The Roman Empire expanded their technology and facilities out into their colonies –this helped in showing the Empire’s might. The Romanisation of the Empire’s colonies manipulated the view the local people had of them; as such the grand and lavish Roman architecture present throughout the Roman Empire emphasized their power and strength. By giving the local people the same amenities available in Rome, the Emperor was guaranteed their support and utter devotion. The Hadrianic Baths, for example, was built to accommodate the local people and was built in the style of typical Imperial-era baths such as the thermae Caracallae and the thermae Diocletiani. The Romans constructed their buildings using materials that not only made the entire structure …show more content…
The fire in the furnace was regularly stoked by slaves. The underground heating system allowed hot air from the fire to travel up and heat the water in the baths. Heatwaves would travel within brick pillars which held up the structure of the baths. Furnaces (praefurnia) would have been distributed throughout the underground layer of the baths’ warmer rooms; in the Baths of Caracalla as much as 50 praefurnia may have been symmetrically arranged underneath the caldarium. Cauldrons would have also been used to boil water to emit steam that flowed through a flue and was transferred through small passages in the hotter rooms, especially the saunas, or the laconica. The Romans used brick because they knew that brick held the heat in, thus allowing the heat to transfer towards other parts of the structures using the brick pillars. This supported the propaganda that conveyed Rome’s greatness …show more content…
Bathing was a necessary part of daily Roman life and became a central focus for social and leisure activities. The use of bathing houses derived from an early Greek model of a bathhouse. Like the Romans, the Greeks had their own bathing regimen that served as the basis for the Roman standard. However the Roman bathhouses surpassed the Greek through size and purpose. Not only did the baths provide Romans a place for physical exercise and hygiene, it was also a gathering point with plenty of shops, offices and libraries, among other things. All three bathhouses adhered to the hot-to-cold system, and the floor plans for each bathing house clearly show the direction in which this system is laid out. This system was interchangeable, depending on the bather himself. Before they went on with their cleaning regimen, the Romans would often engage in physical exercise; then as they finished they would leave their clothes in the apodyteria (changing room) and cool off in the natatio. This interchangeable three-step process involved going into the cooler room called the frigidarium; then bathers would proceed into the warmer room called the tepidarium, and after that would move into the hot room called the caldarium, which had steam emanating from the intense heat of the water. Romans would then socialise with others, whilst strolling along the

Related Documents