The Greenhouse Effect: Thermal Energy And Global Warming

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The greenhouse effect is a system in which certain gases in the Earth’s atmosphere trap infrared radiation emitted from the Earth and re-radiate it in all directions. This causes additional heating of the Earth. As the radiation from the Sun is absorbed by the Earth’s surface, the energy is converted to thermal energy. Then, the Earth radiates lower-energy infrared radiation back out to the atmosphere and space. The Earth’s atmosphere and clouds absorb this infrared energy and radiation directed from the Sun by greenhouse gases. Some examples of greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapour. Then, these gases emit the energy back in every direction, in which some reach back to Earth to warm it even more. The greenhouse gases …show more content…
Then, like the natural greenhouse effect on Earth, the thermal energy cannot escape out of the greenhouse but is trapped inside, and the cold energy outside cannot enter either. This is because glass is a poor heat conductor, which means that its atoms are tightly bound so that they cannot easily move around and transfer energy. Thus, a greenhouse is warm and is effective for plantation because there is no need to worry about frost or cold air harming the plants. The greenhouse effect is important for life on Earth because it helps maintain the average global temperature of the Earth. It warms the Earth surface additionally from the balance between the energy absorbed by Earth and its atmosphere from the Sun and the energy radiated back again by Earth and the atmosphere. The tolerable warm temperature thanks to the greenhouse effect allows organisms to live on …show more content…
They also capture airborne pollutants and atmospheric deposition, and filter noxious gases. This helps improve air quality. Green roofs also absorb storm water, which reduces water usage. Furthermore, green roofs promote biodiversity as they can sustain a variety of plants and invertebrates, and provide a habitat for various bird species. Lastly, green roofs have excellent noise attenuation can reduce sound/noise pollution. Cellulose insulation is made from recycled paper, mostly of recycled newspapers. This reduces greenhouse gas production as it reduces the amount of paper that end up in landfills, which produce greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide as it decomposes. If all of the paper in landfills were converted to cellulose insulation technology, it is approximated that about eight million tons of carbon dioxide emissions would be reduced. In addition, using recycled materials help conserve natural resources such as reducing deforestation. Last but not least, cellulose insulation is produced in most areas of the planet, which causes shorter shipping distances, lowering fossil fuel combustion and greenhouse gas

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