Chinese Famine Analysis

1685 Words 7 Pages
The Famine In the start of the second five year plan, Mao told his people to eat as much as tell wanted to eat so that their strengths can go into agriculture and produce more food to provide to the people of china. During the autumn season, people were told to eat, not worrying about the winter time. During the winter season the amount of food supply decreased. During Chinese New Year, the elderly and the sick began to die and over 25 million people were starving when spring came. The agriculture of china was a failure of Mao because he gave bad methods to the people and gave bad instructions to the people. His action caused china to go into a great famine, killing over millions people , which showed the poor leadership of Chairman Mao …show more content…
People hated Mao and would not forgive him for what he had done to them. People over harvested on livestock because they did not have enough grains, which led to even more starvation. Some families had to abandon their children or give them away to orphanages because they are unable to feed or care for their children. Mao’s action cause the Chinese Communist Party to fall in population and economy. Mao had lost his trust of the people and began to self-doubt in his ability as china’s …show more content…
The general purpose of the slogans were to show that he was a party member and that he is the ideal party member. In 1966, Mao prepared for his great return, at age 72, Mao swam across the Yangtze River with a lot of reporters recording and photographing him. Mao swam across the river to prove to his people, in a form of propaganda that at age 72, he was still young, strong, and capable to lead China. He organized a mass movement called the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution or the GPCR. The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution had three aspects, they were to purify the arts, to create a new revolutionary group in china, and to destroy all that the previous leaders had built. The new revolutionary group in China were the Red Guards. The Red Guards were made up of university students, who become Mao’s soldiers. The students wanted more freedom to achieve more goals. They got frustrated and went mad. Mao took their frustration as a way for them to carry out a revolution under Mao’s name. From the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution’s propaganda and the intimidation from the Red Guards, China was getting ready for the great return of Maoism and their leader Mao

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