The Great Gatsby Tone Analysis

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The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is considered to be one of America 's greatest works of literature because of its twisting and realistic plots and developed characters during the 1920s. This era was the epitome of reckless behavior during the prohibition that caused people to use ones money to reflect power over others. Fitzgerald discusses the ideals of the New Yorker life through his word choice and descriptive characters. He explores the high socialite status and gives an insight on the class division along with the struggles that come with by using characterization to explain the views of the different classes and people in New York. Fitzgerald also eludes to their inner feelings by using their speech to display a tone. His novel …show more content…
Fitzgerald 's tone changes throughout the novel as he switches from character to character. Jay Gatsby is generally a mysterious character as described by other people but has a soft side for Daisy. Gatsby experiences the feeling of disappointment during the story quite regularly. This feeling can be seen through Fitzgerald 's descriptive words that are spoken about or by Gatsby. As the narrator Nick Carraway describes; "He [Gatsby] was leaning against a table in the hall, heavy with dejection or sleep," (Fitzgerald 147). The tone of this is trying to show how disappointed Gatsby is with himself because he put so much of his life towards loving Daisy and has failed to fully win her heart. Gatsby knows that Daisy has chosen Tom over him which left him to express the feelings of disappointment that can be seen through Fitzgerald 's words. The love Gatsby feels has internally torn him apart which has lead him to be disappointed and feel …show more content…
Tom is a wealthy, stuck up man who believes that cheating is one sided. He goes about his life with his wife, Daisy, along with a poorer mistress. He is okay with the fact that he cheats on his wife; however, with he finds out that his wife is doing the same but with Gatsby he is outraged and angry. "She had told him [Gatsby] that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw. He was astounded. His mouth opened a little and he looked at Gatsby, and then back at Daisy," (Fitzgerald 119). The reader can understand how Tom is feeling during this moment by how Fitzgerald describes how he looks in response to the other characters actions. This is one time in the book that the reader can see how much Tom truly cares for Daisy because he cannot believe that she would cheat on him. Love torn Tom apart because it made him feel lonely and angry that someone else could have his wife and that she is not going to be there for him whenever he needs her. Tom becomes furious with the fact that Daisy loves Gatsby because Tom does not like how Gatsby obtained his money and the fact that he is an "West-egger". This is shown throughout the book with the use of Tom 's angry tone towards

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