The Theme Of Appearance And Reality In The Great Gatsby

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The Strength of Deception: How Appearance Can Mask Reality The true nature of an individual can be concealed by their appearances, as looks often serve to obscure a darker truth. Within Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, the stark contrast between appearance and reality is constantly reiterated through multiple characters, and the power of looks to seemingly alter the real world is a prevalent theme. Fitzgerald produces a work of literature that truly challenges the reader to differentiate between fiction and truth, illustrating how the two can so easily become intertwined. The Great Gatsby underscores the importance of appearance on reality, and emphasizes the need to notice how greatly reality can deviate from one’s fabricated life by revealing the power of appearance, the strength of deception, and the dire consequences that stem from attempting to disguise the true nature of life. The difference between appearance and reality is primarily illustrated by showing how false appearances can alter reality itself. Jay Gatsby is a college dropout that came from a poor household, yet his appearance suggests that he graduated Oxford University and comes from great wealth. The manipulation of Gatsby’s life has led him to become famous, and his true past has become muddled deep within a sea of false claims and …show more content…
The evident differences between appearance and reality within the story play an integral role, as they aid in displaying how virtually every appearance acts as a veil that conceals a darker truth. The Great Gatsby conveyed the harsh truth that the decision to rely on appearance instead of reality will lead to a detrimental lifestyle, for one’s life cannot be lived without reality to act as a guiding

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