The Great Gatsby Barbed Wire Analysis

Superior Essays
F. Scott Fitzgerald uses his novel The Great Gatsby to tell the story of Jay Gatsby, a man driven purely by his desire for Daisy Fay. A major theme in The Great Gatsby is the past, and the novel focuses on Gatsby’s effort to recreate the past. Although Gatsby grows up in a modest environment, he craves for a luxurious lifestyle by escaping his impoverished past and creating his own image. Gatsby’s conception of himself is a lavish figure, which he believes is ultimately his destiny. This new, prosperous, worldly persona is Jay Gatsby, the superior form of James Gatz. Gatsby entwines this destiny with Daisy, believing that to accomplish this dream he must marry Daisy. Gatsby’s dream is embodied in Daisy because she represents old money and class, …show more content…
Gatsby is accustomed to wealthy people but they always had “barbed wire” representing the suspicious origins of their wealth, similar to Dan Cody. Fitzgerald deliberately uses the “barbed wire” imagery to relate to Gatsby’s military background. Gatsby is attracted to Daisy because her wealth is refined and honest. Gatsby found this love he couldn’t possess to be “excitingly desirable” From Gatsby’s perspective Daisy was a “thing” for him to show off; she was the human representation of his car or house, both extravagant and excessive. Gatsby finds Daisy “desirable” because he recognizes their love is forbidden, making it even more prized. Fitzgerald’s use of the verb “took” is meant to allude to their prohibited love. It is as if Gatsby has stolen something of great value that has never truly belonged to him. This mood is heightened by the description of a “still night” meant to insinuate a feeling of tension or mischief. Gatsby “steals” Daisy because they come from distinctive social classes. Daisy doesn’t belong to Gatsby because he is penniless, which only intensifies his desire for her. This is a common theme throughout the novel of East Eggers looking down upon “new …show more content…
Gatsby views Daisy as an object to be sought after, providing Gatsby with his true fantasy: The American Dream. Gatsby is enchanted with all Daisy is able to offer him. When Gatsby first arrives to Daisy’s house his reaction is “it amazed him” His frequent use of the word “it” in the passage directs Gatsby’s love for Daisy to an object. Fitzgerald’s purposeful usage of “it” rather than “she” reveals that Gatsby didn’t love Daisy, but instead what she represented. Gatsby is in love with the idea of Daisy. In his mind, Daisy’s wealth and beauty are inherently the same. Gatsby has idolized Daisy no longer seeing her as a person, but rather an object to be placed upon a pedestal. Daisy herself doesn’t “amaze” Gatsby, but rather her representation in society. Fitzgerald uses the image of a “grail” to exhibit Daisy simply as an object to Gatsby. The “grail” signifies the long quest for immortality that many have pursued, including Gatsby, but ultimately fail. Gatsby isn’t motivated by his love for Daisy, but by the value society has bestowed upon Daisy. Daisy represents the American Dream: the “holy grail” of America. She represents the lifestyle and values that are sought after by the young entrepreneurs and businessmen. Gatsby’s infatuation with Daisy is motivated by the aura she presents. Similar to Greek Gods, Daisy represents a certain set of qualities, specifically “youth” and

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