The Great Game Analysis

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In what ways can the Great Game help us understand contemporary conflicts?
On a June morning in 1842, in the Central Asian town of Bokhara, two ragged figures could be seen kneeling in the dust in the great square before the Emir’s palace. Their arms were tied tightly behind their backs, and they were in a pitiful condition. Not far away were two freshly dug graves. Looking on in silence was a small crowd of Bokharans. Normally executions attracted little attention in this remote, and still medieval, caravan town, for under the Emir’s vicious and despotic rule they were all too frequent. But this one was different. The two men kneeling in the blazing midday sun at the executioner’s feet were British officers. The two men were Colonel Charles
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The diplomatic espionage, military engagement and the collision of distinct geopolitical strivings of the two power received a name “the Great Game” in the West historiography. The Great Game played out across the 19th century. The conflict originated in 1813 by the Russian-French attempt to invade English India and came to the end by Anglo-Russian convention in 1907 (Trenin 2014).
Although the Great Game came to close in 1907, it can be very useful in explaining contemporary world conflicts. There are several conflicts on the Middle East, and Central Asian arena; however, this essay will discuss the modern conflict in Ukraine through the Great Game prism. Though the Great Game prism is a metaphor that explains international political processes in the Central Asia, in this essay it will help us to understand the Ukrainian
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That is why, the current US officials were willing to fulfill own obligations in 2014 (Trenin 2014). President of the United States, Barack Obama appealed to the world community for negotiation and peaceful decision on the crisis. He also stated, “The referendum was a clear violation of the Ukrainian Constitution and international law and it is not recognized by the international community” (Banerjee and Talukdar 2014). Furthermore, Barack Obama imposed sanctions against Russia and stated that the US would apply additional sanctions, if Russian officials persists in intervention in Ukraine. For instance, the US applied visa restrictions against Russia (Banerjee and Talukdar 2014). Then, the US Congress also sent 1 billion US $ in order to arrange reforms and organize elections in Ukraine. Moreover, the US began to maintain NATO expansion in the Eastern Europe. According to NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the joining Crimea to Russia was a “wake-up call” for the NATO and other European establishments (Rywkin 2014). However, some republicans and democrats criticize Barack Obama actions towards Ukraine, recalling the Afghanistan and Iraq

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