Great Famine And Irish Exodus: A Documentary Analysis

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Food is the most colorful part of the day. With its gastronomic range, the possibilities are endless. Everyone in the world depends on food, whether to experience that burst of flavor in the mouth or to survive. But when there is a shortage of food, what is to blame? The people who eat and cultivate it? Or factors outside their control? The Great Famine and the Irish Exodus is an example of this question. Margaret M. Mulrooney’s Fleeing the Famine: North America and Irish Refugees, BBC’s The Great Famine, and Timothy G. Lynch’s A Kindred and Congenial Element: Irish-American Nationalism’s Embrace of Republican Rhetoric analyze the Great Famine and Irish Exodus from varying viewpoints.
BBC’s The Great Famine summarizes the Great Famine. The documentary discusses how over 1/3 of the population was dependent on the potato. So when the blight came, the Irish were left suffering in poverty and disease, as well as death. English Prime Minister Sir
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While it tries to be unbiased, it backs up the English more than the Irish. The work includes describing the Irish with disapproving qualities. Mulrooney’s Fleeing the Famine: North America and Irish Refugees provides a good overview of the Irish migration away from the Famine but, does not show the Irish struggling in their attempt to survive in a new country. Mulrooney only describes their successful attempts to find work and obtain a job with du Pont. Lynch’s A Kindred and Congenial Element: Irish-American Nationalism’s Embrace of Republican Rhetoric describes Irish nationalism in America. The Irish in the Republican Party take a firm stance against the English because they believe that they caused the plague but what Lynch did not analyze was whether the Republican Party was well suited for them. America, in a sense, is a product of England and could have been supporting the English during this

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