Great Depression And African Americans In The 1930's

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As the 1930’s approached the nation, the Great Depression rattled not only the economy, but had created apparent separated affects between classes of Americans, and some of this divide persisted into the Second World War. The effects of both events affected everyone from African Americans, to Jews, and wageworkers to labor Unions. Above any other groups, ethnic groups and immigrants endured significant hardships due to white hostility. With an increasing want for government provision from citizens, the decade rang in with new policies to boost the economy. The policies were put into place to improve the livelihoods of those severely affected by the depression, and the decade was enclosed with an increasing momentum of involvement in international …show more content…
Anti-Semitism was high between the interwar years, where private schools, camps, colleges, resorts, and places of employment all imposed restriction and quotas against Jews. These types of harsh feelings extended across all ethnic groups. Relief programs, like the Tennessee Valley Authority, constantly maintained pay differences between, employment quota systems, and other forms of discrimination toward especially African Americans and Mexican Americans. In places like Chicago, Milwaukee, Cleveland, and Pittsburgh relief work in New Deal agencies, such as the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, Works Progress Administration, and the Civil Works Administration, most of the time increased conflict between unemployed whites and African Americans. Mexican Americans had a constant stereotype against them as lazy, often believed to be just a temporary source of foreign laborers who weren’t entitled to relief. Asian Americans also suffered to some extent the same experiences. They endured massive unemployment, housing evictions, starvations, and constant racial hostility in most industries. For most racial minorities, the unemployment rate rose up to over fifty-percent, whereas the general unemployment was only twenty-percent, and often the first to lose their jobs, and most of the time …show more content…
Women had regular military duties and provided assistance under the Women’s Army Corps, but were in most cases not viewed respectfully. About 6 million women ended up joining the workforce during the war as well, but three ruthless assumptions were made regarding their work during WWII; It was only temporary, they were suppose to remain feminine, and were motivated by traditional roles as housewives and mothers. Finally, as it turns out, mobilizing the workforce to produce military goods for the military became the solution to the U.S. uplift from the Great Depression. Unemployment declined for wageworkers and these workers finally made a start up for more labor unions. For Farmers, as the war progressed, farmers were asked to produce much more food with fewer workers. There was a period of high need of production for military needs, but agricultural exports dropped due to war as well. Overall, the net cash income for farmers increased, but farmers had to end up dealing with everything from the War Production Board to the War Food Administration to meet high needs. From the time periods of 1929 to late 1940’s, these events affected many groups and different types of people, with some struggling and others thriving. As we saw, most of the ethnic minorities faced the most hardships, where women saw an increase in their involvement, and farmers benefited from broad range of new administrative programs. The Great Depression

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