The Great Depression Research Paper

1265 Words 6 Pages
The daily life of the average American was never the same after the United States’ involvement in World War I. Throughout the early 1920s the economy was booming as businesses thrived off the increased spending of the public. The flourishing consumer culture generated new forms of leisure such as the radio, the automobile, and Hollywood films as apart of the everyday life. However, this period of prosperity would drift off as demand for these products decreased. After the 1929 crash, the United States plunged into the Great Depression. As many felt devastating consequences during this time, the government frantically searched for a solution. President Franklin D. Roosevelt developed the New Deal to pull America out of the Great Depression. …show more content…
Martha Gellhorn witnessed the needs of the impoverished Americans of North Carolina in 1934. In her report she states, “The children have no shoes and that woman is terrified of the coming cold as if it were a definite physical entity.” Throughout the Great Depression many families were incapable of affording the basic necessities such as food, clothes, and a home. Even as the harshest winters approached many children went to school without shoes. Not only did families face hard times, but also the unemployed and elderly struggled to find support from the government. “Only eight states provided even minimal unemployment insurance. There was no public support for the elderly…Few Americans had any retirement savings, and many who had saved watched their accounts erased by failing banks.” The public, unsure of where to turn to, at first looked to private charities such as churches and synagogues for relief. “But by the winter of 1931, these institutions were overwhelmed, unable to keep pace with the extraordinary need.” Understanding the extent of the crisis, Americans utilized democracy to change their government and create a modern welfare …show more content…
The Federal Emergency Relief Administration provided federal funds so that the government would not exhaust its resources and face a budget deficit when beginning state relief programs for the unemployed. The Public Works Administration started a construction program that put people to work, and the Civil Works Administration provided jobs for 4 million Americans by repairing bridges, building highways, and constructing public buildings. The Civilian Conservation Corps mobilized 250,000 young men to do reforestation and conservation work. These men built thousands of bridges, roads, trails, and other structures in state and national parks. By providing opportunities for people to start working again the national infrastructure was able to be

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