The Great Depression In Mildred Taylor's Roll Of Thunder, Hear My Cry

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The Great Depression,1929 through 1939, made the most people in history be unemployed, helpless, and in desperate need of more jobs, food,clothing, and supplies. This disastrous event was also the longest lasting economic downturn in the history of the industrialized world. The Great Depression plays a part and emphasizes the hardships in Mildred Taylor’s historical-fictional novel Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry because the Logan family loses their jobs, they do not have a lot of money, and the people in their community are also struggling to get through while also trying to pay taxes.

The Great Depression materialized suddenly without a warning, changing million of normal lives forever. Succeeding presidency, Herbert Hoover, a republican,
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Also, other things continued to get strong, like families. As us.history.org states on page 48e,” While many undesirable vices associated with hopelessness were on the rise, many family units were also strengthened through the crisis. Mass migrations reshaped the American mosaic. While many businesses perished during the Great Depression, others actually emerged stronger. And new forms of expression flourished in the culture of despair.” Then came along Franklin Delano Roosevelt. On July 2, 1932, he stood before a microphone at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois Roosevelt was the governor in New York. “He spoke confidently, and his words rang out through the convention hall and poured from radios in living rooms all across America.’ I pledge you,’ Roosevelt’s voice boomed,”I pledge myself for a new deal for the American people.’” Franklin was chosen as president on March 4, 1933. Hoover urged companies to stop laying off workers and called on charities to help and the poor. Roosevelt offered a different approach. Under his New Deal, the government would establish new programs to help people directly. This promise helped him with the election in November 1932. President Roosevelt 's fireside chats gave the American’s hope that the Depression would soon be over. The New Deal helped millions of struggling American people, but it took a massive world war to make the U.S. economy healthy again. World War II began in Europe in 1939. At that time, the unemployment in the United States was down to 17 percent. The U.S. geared up for war, and millions of American’s went off to fight. The economy grew strong once again, but America was changed by the past hardships, and they were more cautious.”The years of hardships had changed Americans. Those who lived during the time of hunger and desperation never forgot it. Many Americans became

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