Theme Of Bildungsroman In Jane Eyre

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Jane Eyre by charlotte Bronte corresponds to the literary genre called Bildungsroman. It relates to the educative events of the journey life takes from childhood to adulthood. The passage studied in this essay is also classed as Gothic genre which features supernatural element like the voice of Mr Rochester Jane recalls clearly hearing out of an unlikely place. In this novel we see Jane growing up in adversary environments passing through a lot of obstacles which she must surmount to survive. Amidst the people she meets on her journey Jane differentiate between those who give her joy, security and love like Mr Rochester with his passionate love, and those who incarcerate her like Mrs Reed with her harsh punishment. Those two people give us …show more content…
St John is a dutiful missionary devoid of any romantic passion except for the salvation of souls. It is impossible for Jane to accept that she will live as his wife, for she knows in her heart that he does not love her. Jane’s experienced different forms of affection during her time at Lowood and Thornfield and she knows in her heart that St John’s desire to marry her is not motivated by love “I knew the difference-for I had felt what it was to be loved” (ch 35 p357). However, the pure passion St John reveals for his vocation moves Jane to the point of accepting to marry him and sacrifice what she desires the most: to be an equal, to love and be loved. Although St John uses tormenting religious propos to force Jane to choose his path, Jane is deeply moved by his display of sincerity and gentleness. St John manifestation of tenderness at this moment affects Jane so profoundly that she is very close to giving herself to him. “Oh, that gentleness! How far more potent is it than force! ( …) I grew pliant as a reed under his kindness.” (ch35, p 357) But she knows that ‘gentleness’ is not a quality she found abundantly in St John but in Mr Edward Fairfax Rochester. Nevertheless, St John’s show of emotion, unknowingly, reminds Jane of the sweet love of Mr Rochester; and now while in his arms she cannot help but compare his …show more content…
There Jane, ten years old at the time, was locked up, hurt, alone and terrified after being violently attacked by her cousin John Reed. It was dark, her imagination was running wild with the stories of ghosts and superstitions she had heard from the servants, about the red-room. In her child’s mind she felt and heard a presence “something seemed near me; I was oppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down” (ch2 P14). The intense fear and powerlessness combined with the dread of the visitation of her dead uncle spirit, were too much to bear for the little Jane. consequently this traumatic episode left Jane profoundly wounded mentally and physically. Patrick Morris in an article writes “The chronic situation of fear and helplessness that Jane experiences as a child is often a harbinger of severe personality disorder in later life.” (Bronte’s Studies, Vol. 38 No. 2, April 2013, 157-68). Jane describes the red room as a “secure jail” ( Ch 2) and she felt “for ever condemned” by the people leaving with her, the intensity of rejection Jane experienced encloses her in a sort of internal prison leaving her very ill “I felt physically weak and broken down: but my worse ailment was an unutterable wretchedness of mind” (ch

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