The Gospel Of Wealth Summary

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Devalued Wealth
Today exist at the top of the economic stratum a small percentage of the overall United States’ population who relish in the great comforts and luxuries their wealth has permitted them to enjoy. Meanwhile, at the bottom of the stratum are those who cannot afford nor have access to the most basic resources. Despite numerous economic classes are here to undefined, the gap between the wealthy and the impoverished is nonetheless expansive. The wealthy are elite groups who have the upper hand in society because they control the nation’s economic and political powers. Such are the advantages the wealthy own over their counterparts in this precise economic spectrum, taking a closer look into the origin of class division and the challenges this creates is fitting. For example, “The Gospel of Wealth” by Andrew Carnegie, explores how the financially prosperous are to administer their wealth to the poor. Unfortunately, due to Carnegie’s biased and undeterred view to confirm the law of competition as crucial to civilization, his erroneous declaration of a binary economic class, and his contradiction of analysis on individualism based on the ideology of survival of the fittest, attribute to the inefficacy in the author’s deployment of his argument.
Carnegie takes an adamant bearing towards the law of competition, denoting it as
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This does not negate that monetary assistance is unavailable to individuals who need it most, but it does rise concern to what amount of wealth is misappropriated by the wealthy. Unfortunately, charity does not solve the issue created in part to industrialism. While the rich continue to multiply wealth, the poor continue to multiply. This division of the rich and the poor is and has always been the biggest challenge faced in this great

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