The God Complex In Frankenstein, By Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Decent Essays
The Monster’s God
Victor Frankenstein is a character in Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein that has been accused of “playing God” because he goes against nature and dares to create life from death. Frankenstein possesses a God Complex that is apparent through his demeanor, social interactions, and choices. According to Analytical Psychology and Psychoanalysis, “‘The God Complex’ is a widespread psychological illusion of unlimited personal potential which misguides the person and can sometimes be the cause of serious troubles between the person and the society.” The Cyber Bullying Radar contributes that the person who possesses a God Complex may believe that he is never wrong, may not care about rules set by society, and believes that he can
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This is a premature indication that Frankenstein does not care about rules. It is a definite rule of nature that death is the final end that all humans are vulnerable to from the moment they are born, but Frankenstein wants to defy that rule. This yearning that Frankenstein keeps at the back of his mind gradually advances to the forefront as life’s circumstances enable him to try to accomplish the feat. His mother’s death was “the first misfortune of [his] life…-an omen…of [his] future misery,” (28). As Frankenstein reflects this time in his life he is able to point out the catalyst that speeds up his descent toward the dark side of outdated and crude alchemy. Frankenstein describes how everyone will inevitably feel “…that rude hand rent away some dear connection,” (29). Shelley’s diction of the word “rude” indicates Frankenstein’s opinion of the Being who takes away life. This moment in the novel is when Frankenstein begins to dislike how life is organized which compels him to alter …show more content…
Waldman, a professor at Ingolstadt University, that the philosophers of the ancient form of science, alchemy, may “…seem only to dabble in dirt…”, but they “…have indeed performed miracles” such as showing “…how [nature] works in her hiding-places”, “...how the blood circulates, and the nature of the air we breathe. They have acquired new and almost unlimited powers…and even mock the invisible world with its own shadows,” (33). This statement causes Frankenstein’s thought of going against nature to become a reality that enables Frankenstein’s “…mind [to fill] with one thought, one conception, one purpose,” (33). He becomes obsessed and fervently studies anatomy, the effects of death on a human carcass, and chemistry. He steals parts of human carcasses from a charnel-house, the dissecting room, and the slaughterhouse. Stealing is defined by society as an immoral act that falls under criminal actions, but Frankenstein ignores this universal rule in favor of doing as he pleases, which furthers the rift between Frankenstein and society. There are many moments where he was at “the very brink of certainty, [but he] failed [at creating life from death]; yet still [he] clung to the hope which the next day or the next hour might realize,” (39). This is another example of Frankenstein’s God Complex because he believes he has “unlimited personal potential” (Analytical Psychology and

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