The Role Of God In The Gospel Of Judas

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The portrayal of Jesus as the Son of God, the Savior, and the Lord and what it means to believe in his identity makes this gospel relevant to the church. In the first verse of chapter one he writes, “When the world began, the word existed already. The word was with God. And the word was God himself. The word was present with God at the beginning of all things. God made everything by means of the Word. The Word caused all things to exist. He gave life to everything that God created His life gave light to everybody,” (Adams, John tells the Good News about Jesus). The context of the word “life” is not used solely in its literal meaning. Instead, it includes the period between birth and death in the physical state of the human body as well as the …show more content…
It reiterates the themes of the spiritual divinity and the kingdom of heaven. It consists of conversations between Jesus and Judas Iscariot. In the synoptic gospels of Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John, Judas is also included but he is portrayed differently. In the Gospel of Judas, he is a portrayal of Jesus instead of a betrayer of Jesus. In the gospel, Jesus often laughs at the apostles for their ignorance, and he provides a different explanation of Jesus. In addition, he concludes Judas as the thirteenth disciple and he commissions Judas to portray him. Throughout the conversations between Jesus and Judas an insight on salvation is provided along with an impair few on the generation of amongst …show more content…
In the conversations between Jesus and Judas, Jesus says that “[he] went to another great generation,” and he stated that the generation among Judas was the “generation of humanity,” that is defiled, (The Gospel of Judas, 2). The people are not fulfilling the expectations of God they are simply acting out of stupidity in terms of the entrapments of the earthly things. Jesus says “the souls of every human generation will die, when these people, however, have completed the time of the kingdom and the spirit leaves them, their bodies will die but their souls will be alive, and they will be taken up,” (The Gospel of Judas, 3). Here the prerequisite of salvation is being exuberated. It is guaranteed that the bodily or physical state of the human beings will cease. However, if they are faithful followers of Jesus Christ and his kingdom on earth, they will be granted eternal life. The casting of the bodily things as a restriction in the generation of humanity allows salvation to be considered a result of knowledge rather than the standard perception of salvation being a result of sin and

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