The Glass Escalator Analysis

Good Essays
All four of the articles show the disparities that exist within the work environment. “The Glass Escalator” by Christine L. Williams showed how men not only face a huge advantage in female dominated careers but also discrimination. “The Global Woman” by Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russell Hochschild tell how many immigrant women are leaving their home countries at alarming rates to take on domestic jobs elsewhere. “The Globetrotting Sneaker” by Cynthia Enloe is about how many companies benefit from globalization, and use it as a tool to dehumanize and mistreat women in foreign countries. Lastly, “Fort Bragg: Command” by Jefferey McGowan details how biased the military was, and still is, against homosexuals, especially during the “Don’t …show more content…
Men are often hired more because they are men (Williams, 1992), and they are often given managerial and administrative positions, that usually provide a higher pay than before, over women (Williams, 1992). However, as a result of the stereotypes surrounding masculinity, being in a female dominated career can lead to a high level of discrimination, that is almost on par to what women face in male dominated careers (Williams, 1992). When men enter these female careers, they can be penalized if they stay in that same occupation for too long. The men experience disappointment from their bosses who think that they are not taking the initiative to be promoted, and show a low-level of motivation, or other people that they meet start to think that they had trouble landing a “real career,” (Williams 1992). A similar phenomenon can be found with homosexual men in the military. If gay men in the military are outed, their careers are basically over, as many people will try to come up with ways to fire them. This can be seen in McGowan’s “Fort Bragg: Command,” where the Colonel started questioning McGowan about the gay Sergeant Lopez, and tried to convince him to make a paper trial against Lopez so it would be easier to fire him (McGowan, 2005). Lopez, and McGowan, have to face punishment, in the form of insults and discrimination, for violating …show more content…
In the United States, women rights started improving, and many women were at the liberty to decide if they wanted to enter the job market. Because, as women became more preoccupied with their careers, overtime families, and mothers, have been inclined to hire domestic workers, or nannies, into their household. The domestic mothers became a second mother to their assigned children, at the expense of her own biological children (Ehrenreich, et. al., 2003). Many women in developing countries did not experience the same prosperity that American, and other foreign women had. In order to take care of their children, they had no choice but to seek out the only employment they could, which was become a domestic worker overseas. Globalization has allowed for millions of women from poor and developing countries find jobs in other countries as nannies, maids, and sex workers (Ehrenreich, et. al., 2003). These women often view themselves as either lucky and empowered that they at least have the option to become the breadwinner of their families, or unlucky and unfortunate if they become employed by criminals (Ehrenreich, et. al. 2003). Regardless of how these women ore society sees them, Globalization has resulted in them being

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