The Girl Who Was Plugged In: Book Analysis

1963 Words 8 Pages
Life is ripe with complex and unanswered questions. Often, contemplation of these difficult topics can enhance an individual’s understanding of both themselves and the world around them in meaningful ways. Despite the various misconceptions and stereotypes that frequently surround the genre, science fiction is often written for these types of introspective purposes. Although science fiction authors typically write fantastic tales that take place in a wide variety of futuristic societies, there are traces of reality that can be found within them. By reflecting upon the differences between these fictional societies and reality, whether they be good or bad, man of the problematic aspects and challenging philosophies of the real world can be made …show more content…
The protagonist of his piece is a young woman by the name of P. Burke who is described as “the ugly of the world” (Tiptree 2). A company called GTX selects her for an interesting marketing job that requires her to be plugged into a machine through skin electrodes that allow her to remotely control a beautiful but artificially grown human body named Delphi to subliminally advertise products to the public. When P. Burke first plugs in, Tiptree narrates, “Sitting up in the bed is the darlingest girl child you’ve EVER seen… Then she can’t resist rubbing her hands down over her minibreasts and belly. Because, you see, it’s the godawful P. Burke who is sitting there hugging her perfect girl-body, looking at you out of delighted eyes” (Tiptree 5). By using exaggerated descriptions such as “the ugly of the world” and “the darlingest girl child you’ve EVER seen,” Tiptree clearly distinguishes between the physical nature of the two characters in order to emphasize that they are distinct beings. Nevertheless, he also explicitly points out that it is P. Burke who is controlling Delphi’s “perfect girl-body” which creates an interesting situation for analysis. Both P. Burke and Delphi have clearly human bodies which according to Stone would qualify them both as such; however, …show more content…
Rick Deckard, the protagonist of the film, is a former Blade which is a member of a special police force who finds and assassinates Replicants. Replicants are described to viewers as highly evolved robots “designed to copy human beings in every way except their emotions” (Blade Runner). The use of the word “copy” denotes that even though these androids are virtually identical to humans in almost every regard, they are only mimicking humans and are not actually classified as such. Since the only element that sets the Replicants apart from their human counterparts is their lack of emotion, Scott is also suggesting that emotions are one of the key components necessary to qualify someone as human. Furthermore, after Deckard uses the Voight Kampff test on Rachel at Tyrell’s request, he realizes that Rachel is not aware that she is actually a Replicant herself. In response, Tyrell assures Deckard that “Rachel is an experiment” and explains his findings: “if we gift them with [memories], we create a cushion of a pillow for their emotions then consequently we can control them better” (Blade Runner). Ironically, after implying that Replicants do not have emotion and therefore are not human, Tyrell suggests that by supplying the Replicants with artificial memories they can

Related Documents