The Gilded Age, By Charlotte Perkins Gilman

1533 Words 7 Pages
In the late 1800s to early 1900s, there was a time of great oppression for female citizens in America as well as most of the world. Whether it was being forced into marriage roles based on gender, extreme unfair working rights, or a lack of suffrage, women were becoming more and more obedient to men by the minute. In an attempt to cripple the oppression, educated women often made their talents public by putting work into great literature works and public speaking along with also protesting. Women ultimately changed society 's views on them for many years to come. Among these women was Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Gilman was a feminist writer, commercial artist, lecturer, magazine editor, and social reformer who was born in 1860. According to …show more content…
It makes me think of all the yellow things I ever saw- not beautiful ones like buttercups, but old, foul, bad yellow things" (Gilman 12). At first, she assumes that the room is a nursery room because of the torn wallpaper, scratched floors, and barred windows. However, Jane then begins to realize that it once housed another woman that was also locked in there against her will. That observation and dark realization is possibly a symbol for what was called “The Gilded Age”. This term was brought up by Mark Twain 's book, which had the same title. In that book, he used The Gilded Age to describe how America seemed like a utopian land from the outside, but was actually a crime and poverty filled place on the insides. The book also provides a quote from "The Gilded Age" about the way that women were looked at during that time. The quote "A woman 's intuitionism better than a man 's. Nobody knows anything, really, you know, and a woman can guess a good deal nearer than a man" (Twain 339) showed that. The fact that a man was making observations like that, is such a crazy idea for what people back then used to believe in. This quote, along with the time in which this book was written and the description of Jane 's thoughts about the room, showed that the room is a symbol for America in the late 1800s. Aside from the obvious symbolism of the …show more content…
The gender roles that men and women played at the time versus how a woman felt about that; is what makes up the latter part of the story. Jane’s escape of the yellow wallpaper that took her down a spiral of madness inside a room where she was locked in because of how she was viewed as a woman serves as the end of the cautionary tale of how a woman feels when she is not allowed to voice opinions, be treated equal, and many other restrictions women faced before women’s rights became a national debate. The fact that the male character faints at the sight of Jane’s personal victory inside the yellow room could also be seen as a winning moment for women during that

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